Station Monitor

The Station Monitor, which is both mobile and desktop friendly, allows you to easily answer the question “Did the ground move near me?” You can quickly find a station near you or search a global station map to explore recent ground motions, learn about recent earthquakes, and see recordings from past large earthquakes. Station hosts and anyone else who has an interest in a particular station can view and compare daily recordings from their station. 

This tool is also available as a downloadable app for phones and tablets.

GooglePlay 
 
App store

To complement this app, sign up for our Recent Earthquake Teachable Moment presentations which are created by our group following earthquakes >M 7 worldwide. From pulldown menu, select "Education" and "Recent Earthquakes Teachable Moments"


Keypoints:

  • View seismic recordings
  • Choose from hundreds of stations
  • Learn information about recent events 
  • See recordings from past earthquakes 
  • See annotations of wave arrivals 


Level: Novice

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