Register for the 2019 Joint SAGE/GAGE Workshop!

Please join us at the 2019 Joint SAGE/GAGE Workshop, to be held in Portland, OR, October 9th-11th. The joint workshop theme is 'Earth in 4D: Bridging the Timescales in Dynamic Earth Processes’. Continue Reading

Seismology on Ice!

Follow the adventures of Dr. Bob Woodward, the Director of IRIS Instrumentation Services, as he travels to Antarctica to do "Seismology on Ice"! Continue Reading

IRIS PASSCAL to Expand Pool of Seismic Instruments

IRIS has begun the procurement of 460 Fairfield nodes for general PASSCAL pool use. The new nodes should be ready for general usage starting in February 2019 (bringing the general node pool to 533 units). Continue Reading

UPCOMING EVENTS

Oct 9-11 2019 SAGE/GAGE Workshop: Earth in 4D: Bridging the Timescales in Dynamic Earth Processes
Hilton Portland Downtown, Portland, OR,
May 22 Celebrating EarthScope's Fifteen Years of Geoscience Accomplishments
Washington, DC
Jul 16 IRIS/SSA Distinguished Lectureship Series
Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Empirical Theater (Portland,Oregon)
Oct 17 IRIS/SSA Distinguished Lectureship Series
Exploratorium (San Francisco,California)
Oct 18 IRIS/SSA Distinguished Lectureship Series
Southwestern Oregon Community College (Coos Bay,Oregon)
Nov 12 IRIS/SSA Distinguished Lectureship Series
American Museum of Natural History (New York,New York)
Earthquake Resources

New Earthquake Safety Video!

If you live in earthquake-prone regions it isn’t a question of IF, but WHEN an earthquake will occur. This animation shows quick steps to take if you are in a building, outside, in bed, in a classroom or lab, in a wheelchair, in a store, in a high rise, or in a car.

NEW ANIMATION! Foreshock, mainshock or aftershock?

Large earthquakes are usually followed by hundreds and even thousands of smaller earthquakes, called aftershocks. In some earthquake sequences, a smaller earthquake called a “foreshock”, precedes the mainshock.

Investigating “man-made quakes” in Western Canada

Investigating “man-made quakes” in Western Canada

In the US, most induced earthquakes are the result of wastewater injection, whereas in western Canada, induced earthquakes are more closely correlated with hydraulic fracturing operations. Why do some areas experience induced earthquakes while others remain seismically inactive?
A subduction zone in pieces: the segmented Cascadia megathrust

A subduction zone in pieces: the segmented Cascadia megathrust

Onshore and offshore seismic data informs researchers working on megathrust boundaries, improving our understanding of where subduction zone earthquakes might occur and why.
Injection Wells Can Induce Earthquakes Miles Away from the Well

Injection Wells Can Induce Earthquakes Miles Away from the Well

A study by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz finds that injecting fluid into sedimentary rock can produce bigger, more distant earthquakes than injecting into the underlying basement rock.