IRIS data used to win Gold Medal in Science Fair!

Student project "The Silence of Canadian Cities: Seismic Impact of Lockdowns" wins Gold Medal at Science Fair! Continue Reading

IRIS Statement on Racism in Geoscience

We at IRIS join our colleagues from across the country and around the globe in unequivocally denouncing racism. BLACK LIVES MATTER. We also know that racism is persistent in STEM and that there are systemic inequalities in academia and particularly in the geosciences. Continue Reading

Release of the new IRIS mars-event Service for Accessing the Seismic Event Catalog from the InSight Mission to Mars

We are proud to announce the release of the mars-event web service, an implementation of the FDSN-event specification adapted for Martian seismic events known as marsquakes. Continue Reading
Earthquake Resources

What’s the Wiggle?

Did you know seismometers can detect more than just earthquakes? Check out this cool list of crowd sourced wiggles!

Women in Geoscience Video Series - Dr. Gayatri Indah Marliyani

In this episode, we introduce you to Dr. Gayatri Marliyani, a geologist in Indonesia working to understand earthquakes and help communities prepare for this inevitable hazard.

Boundary to backstop: the Eastern Denali Fault

Boundary to backstop: the Eastern Denali Fault

Can the eastern Denali Fault rupture as catastrophically as its westerly counterparts? A team of scientists from the University of Calgary aimed to find out.
The MAGIC of multiple datasets in eastern North America

The MAGIC of multiple datasets in eastern North America

The MAGIC experiment allows scientists to see how complicated tectonic process manifest at deep levels of the eastern margin of North America. By linking the deep structure with surface observations “we can inform our views of the past processes.”
Is Earth’s Core Lopsided? Strange Goings-on in our Planet’s Interior

Is Earth’s Core Lopsided? Strange Goings-on in our Planet’s Interior

Seismologists at the University of California, Berkeley have discovered that Earth’s solid-iron inner core is growing faster on one side than the other, and it has been ever since it started to freeze out from molten iron more than half a billion years ago.