Reduction in seismic noise because of changes in human activity

Researchers who study Earth’s movement are seeing a drop in seismic noise as a result of transport networks and other human activities being shut down. Continue Reading

Final Report on the Ocean Bottom Seismograph Instrument Pool Facility

The final report for the National Science Foundation funded Ocean Bottom Instrument Pool (OBSIP) facility is now available. Continue Reading

Where are the IRIS Interns Now?

A survey finds that most IRIS intern alumni are employed in the geosciences, but across a variety of employment sectors. Continue Reading

UPCOMING EVENTS

Mar 9-10 Marine Seismology Symposium
Maritime Conference Center, Linthicum Heights, Maryland,
May 27 Wednesdays with Wendy (Facebook Live): Build a Seismometer - 1:00 PM ET
Virtual
Jun 1-
Aug 28
Seismology Skill Building Workshop - Summer 2020
Virtual
Earthquake Resources

NEW ANIMATION! Bomb or Earthquake?

How do seismologists tell the difference between an explosion and an earthquake, when both shake the ground? Find out in this new animation!

New Animation! Cascades Subduction Zone—What can the landscape tell us?

This animation describes the geographic provinces of the Pacific Northwest, including the subducting plate, the subduction boundary, the Coast Range, the lowlands, and the Cascades mountain range.

Distant quakes trigger undersea landslides in Gulf of Mexico

Distant quakes trigger undersea landslides in Gulf of Mexico

Massive submarine landslides are often shaken loose if a large earthquake strikes nearby. However, triggers for smaller landslides are poorly understood. In a recent paper Dr. Wenyuan Fan and his colleagues, discovered 85 previously unknown submarine landslides in the Gulf of Mexico by analyzing 8 years of seismic data and extracting characteristic seismic signals of continental slope careening downhill.
Exploring the complexities of the 2019 Ridgecrest earthquake sequence

Exploring the complexities of the 2019 Ridgecrest earthquake sequence

On July 4th, Ridgecrest, California, was rattled by a magnitude 6.4 earthquake. 34 hours later, a magnitude 7.1 earthquake ruptured approximately 10 kilometers away from the initial shock. Learn how this complex earthquake sequence is changing our understanding of how faults work.
Peeking at the Plumbing of One of the Aleutian’s Most Active Volcanoes

Peeking at the Plumbing of One of the Aleutian’s Most Active Volcanoes

A new approach to analyzing earthquake data revealed an impressive level of detail in the deep plumbing system underlying Alaska’s Cleveland volcano.