Reduction in seismic noise because of changes in human activity

Researchers who study Earth’s movement are seeing a drop in seismic noise as a result of transport networks and other human activities being shut down. Continue Reading

Final Report on the Ocean Bottom Seismograph Instrument Pool Facility

The final report for the National Science Foundation funded Ocean Bottom Instrument Pool (OBSIP) facility is now available. Continue Reading

Where are the IRIS Interns Now?

A survey finds that most IRIS intern alumni are employed in the geosciences, but across a variety of employment sectors. Continue Reading

UPCOMING EVENTS

Earthquake Resources

NEW ANIMATION! Bomb or Earthquake?

How do seismologists tell the difference between an explosion and an earthquake, when both shake the ground? Find out in this new animation!

New Animation! Cascades Subduction Zone—What can the landscape tell us?

This animation describes the geographic provinces of the Pacific Northwest, including the subducting plate, the subduction boundary, the Coast Range, the lowlands, and the Cascades mountain range.

Monitoring groundwater with a single seismometer

Monitoring groundwater with a single seismometer

New research shows that a single seismometer can track yearly changes in groundwater level, which may be helpful for aquifers around the world that lack monitoring wells.
Seismometers detect small icebergs produced by Greenland’s glaciers

Seismometers detect small icebergs produced by Greenland’s glaciers

The iceberg-calving process is a key mechanism by which large volumes of ice are lost from Greenland glaciers, yet many details of this process were previously unknown. Now, scientists can learn more about glacial calving using seismic data from the Greenland Ice Sheet Monitoring Network (GLISN).
Early seismic waves hold the clue to the power of the main temblor

Early seismic waves hold the clue to the power of the main temblor

A team of researchers at Harvard University used data products and created numerical models to predict an earthquake’s final magnitude 10 to 15 seconds faster than today’s best algorithms.