Register for the 2019 Joint SAGE/GAGE Workshop!

Please join us at the 2019 Joint SAGE/GAGE Workshop, to be held in Portland, OR, October 9th-11th. The joint workshop theme is 'Earth in 4D: Bridging the Timescales in Dynamic Earth Processes’. Continue Reading

First Release of Data from Mars InSight Now Available

The first data from the Mars SEIS (Seismic Experiment for Internal Structure) instrument is now available from the IRIS Data Management Center, in parallel with the NASA’s Planetary Data System and the IPGP’s Mars SEIS Data Service. Continue Reading

Where are the IRIS Interns Now?

A survey finds that most IRIS intern alumni are employed in the geosciences, but across a variety of employment sectors. Continue Reading

UPCOMING EVENTS

Oct 9-11 2019 SAGE/GAGE Workshop: Earth in 4D: Bridging the Timescales in Dynamic Earth Processes
Hilton Portland Downtown, Portland, OR,
Oct 17 IRIS/SSA Distinguished Lectureship Series
Exploratorium (San Francisco,California)
Oct 18 IRIS/SSA Distinguished Lectureship Series
Southwestern Oregon Community College (Coos Bay,Oregon)
Nov 8 IRIS/SSA Distinguished Lectureship Series
Southwestern Oregon Community College (Coos Bay,Oregon)
Nov 12 IRIS/SSA Distinguished Lectureship Series
American Museum of Natural History (New York,New York)
Nov 13-14 2019 Fall BoD Meetings
Fort Collins, Colorado
Earthquake Resources

New Earthquake Safety Video!

If you live in earthquake-prone regions it isn’t a question of IF, but WHEN an earthquake will occur. This animation shows quick steps to take if you are in a building, outside, in bed, in a classroom or lab, in a wheelchair, in a store, in a high rise, or in a car.

NEW ANIMATION! Foreshock, mainshock or aftershock?

Large earthquakes are usually followed by hundreds and even thousands of smaller earthquakes, called aftershocks. In some earthquake sequences, a smaller earthquake called a “foreshock”, precedes the mainshock.

A tale of time and magnitude

A tale of time and magnitude

Can seismologists determine the size of an earthquake before the earthquake is over?
The hum of the earth

The hum of the earth

Hidden amidst the tumult of seismic data generated by earthquakes, explosions and other earth-shacking phenomena is a quiet hum. Discovered relatively recently, this hum is Earth’s background noise, and it originates within the oceans.
Indonesia’s Devastating 2018 Earthquake was a Rare ‘Supershear’

Indonesia’s Devastating 2018 Earthquake was a Rare ‘Supershear’

According to UCLA researchers, a study using high-resolution observations of the seismic waves caused by the temblor, along with satellite radar and optical images, found that the earthquake propagated unusually fast.