Rapid Earthquake Viewer

NOTE:  This software is no longer being supported.  IRIS is in the process of creating a replacement application that will offer seismograms worldwide for significant earthquakes. Available Fall 2017.

 

The Rapid Earthquake Viewer (REV) provides access to data seismograms from seismograph stations around the world in three "mouse clicks". In REV you can seismic data for an event as three-component data from a single station or a record section (many seismograms, each from a single station, progressively further away). Because REV is intended for educational purposes, the database does not contain seismograms for every event recorded (many seismograms are very "Messy"). Instead, only sizable events, from recent quakes, with "good" seismic data, are included. Thus, if the quake was newsworthy, it is likely to be there. Also, REV even lets you check up on seismograph stations in your area, so if you think you felt the ground shake, check REV!


Keypoints:

  • View three-component seismograms from from a single station for each newsworthy event
  • Event based record sections (many seismograms, each from a single station, progressively further away from a quake)
  • View an image of ground motion from a staiton near you!


Level: Novice

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