How do we really know what’s inside the Earth? Imaging Earth's interior with seismic waves

Students will be able to:

-       Describe Earth’s internal structure (layers of different material properties and composition) and summarize how this is inferred through the analysis of seismic data

-       Estimate the size of Earth’s core using a record section from a recent earthquake

-       Describe how primary and secondary waves propagate through Earth

Differentiate between Earth’s asthenosphere and lithosphere (layers of different mechanical properties)

Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  1. Describe Earth’s internal structure (layers of different material properties and composition) and summarize how this is inferred through the analysis of seismic data
  2. Estimate the size of Earth’s core using a record section from a recent earthquake
  3. Describe how primary and secondary waves propagate through Earth
  4. Differentiate between Earth’s asthenosphere and lithosphere (layers of different mechanical properties)


Level: Intermediate

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