Seismic Waves: P, S, and Surface

What are the three basic types of seismic waves

Video lecture on wave motions and speeds of three fundamental kinds of seismic waves: Primary (P = pressure) waves; Secondary (S = shear); and Surface waves. A seismic wave is an elastic wave generated by an impulse such as an earthquake or an explosion. Seismic waves may travel either along or near the earth's surface (Rayleigh and Love waves) or through the earth's interior (P and S waves). (Recorded during a 2007 teacher workshop on earthquakes and tectonics. Speaker is Dr. Robert Butler, University of Portland Oregon)

Total Time: 3min 4s
Level: Novice

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