Travel Time Curves Described

How can we calculate the distance to an epicenter?

Dr. Robert Butler briefly describes how to use seismic travel-time curves. You can observe the P- and S-wave arrivals on a seismogram to calculate how far away an earthquake was from your station. A traveltime curve is a graph of arrival times, commonly P or S waves, recorded at different points as a function of distance from the seismic source. Seismic velocities within the earth can be computed from the slopes of the resulting curves.

Total Time: 1min 18s
Level: Novice

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Related Animations

A travel time curve is a graph of the time that it takes for seismic waves to travel from the epicenter of an earthquake to the hundreds of seismograph stations around the world. The arrival times of P, S, and Surface waves are shown to be predictable. This animates an IRIS poster linked to this animation.

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