Fault: Left Lateral Strike-slip Fault with No Friction

What if there was no friction between tectonic plates?

Left-lateral fault strike slip fault with little or no friction along fault contact. There is no deformation of the rock adjacent to contact. If the block opposite an observer looking across the fault moves to the left, the motion is termed left lateral.


Keypoints:

  • Low-friction faults have little deformation at the contact.
  • Strike slip faults have right-lateral or left-lateral motion.
  • In a left-lateral fault the relative motion of the block across the fault is to the left.

Total Time: 09s
Level: Novice

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