2022 SAGE/GAGE Community Science Workshop
Sheraton Pittsburgh Hotel at Station Square, Pittsburgh, PA

We look forward to welcoming friends and colleagues to Pittsburgh, June 14-16th, for a long-awaited face-to-face workshop highlighting the exciting science supported by the National Science Foundation's GAGE and SAGE facilities. The theme for this year's workshop is New Horizons: Advancing Seismology and Geodesy for both Science and Society. This workshop will focus on cutting edge geophysical results of processes in the solid earth, cryosphere, oceans and atmosphere and will highlight synergies between the SAGE and GAGE communities.

Science Planning Committee

  • Eric Hetland, University of Michigan
  • Hilary Martens, University of Montana
  • Abhijit Ghosh, University of California - Riverside
  • Vedran Lekic, University of Maryland

IRIS/UNAVCO Planning Contacts

  • Justin Sweet, IRIS
  • Beth Pratt-Sitaula, UNAVCO

Have questions? Contact us at workshop@iris.edu

Code of Conduct: Please take a moment to review our Code of Conduct.
 

Plenary Sessions

New Horizons in Observation: Innovative Data Collection and Analysis

This session highlights observations of earth processes and structures using novel instrumentation or platforms (including DAS, UAVs) as well as cutting-edge analytical and computational techniques critical to efficiently mine large new or existing datasets using advanced tools including machine learning. This session emphasizes research providing new and meaningful insights into the physics of earthquakes, the structure of the Earth, the dynamics of surface processes, and interactions between slow and fast earthquakes.  Beyond new data collection methods, we also examine the discovery and usage of new signals in the “noise” of existing datasets (e.g. GNSS reflectometry, or ambient noise analyses).

New Horizons in Scope: Geophysics in Extreme and Unconventional Environments

This session features geophysics in extreme and/or unconventional environments.  Examples include geophysics work in the oceans or polar regions, on glaciers or volcanoes, or even on other planets.  In light of their unique challenges, new technologies are often required to enable data collection and science return from these environments.  The scientific results from these locations are of particular interest because they can provide rare insights that further our understanding of the many dynamic processes at work on our planet as well as others in the solar system.

New Horizons in Impact: Geophysics for Environment, Climate, and Hazards, and Expanding the Reach of Geophysics

Advances and growth in the geophysical sciences mean that we are expanding our impact on society, particularly as exploitation of natural resources increases. From earthquake early warning to environmental geophysics to shaping public policy, geophysics is touching more lives than ever before. This session explores the ways that seismology and geodesy contribute to our understanding of Earth’s environment, climate, and hazards, as well as the innovative ways that we engage with the public through educational, citizen-science, and communication initiatives.

New Horizons in Modeling: Geophysics Across Space and Time Scales

Understanding the dynamics of the Earth’s surface and interior requires modeling processes occurring over timescales spanning milliseconds to millions of years and spatial scales from that of a single asperity to the entire planet. Seismological and geodetic datasets constraining these processes also span many orders of magnitude in spatial and temporal scale. This session highlights progress in modeling datasets and dynamical processes across scales and across the whole range of geophysical scientific questions, from earthquake nucleation, fault behavior, and tectonic motions, to seismic waveform modeling and imaging from crust to core, to modeling whole-Earth deformation across broad timescales.

New Horizons in Approach: The Intersection of Disciplines

In this session we seek to highlight examples of multidisciplinary research that provide further clarity on fundamental questions in geophysics.  Examples include earthquake analyses using joint seismic and geodetic modeling; subsurface magmatic movements detected geodetically, seismically, and through use of magnetotelluric methods; and/or investigations of the continuum of slip seen at subduction zones from co-seismic to periodic to aseismic.

TRAVEL SUPPORT SCHOLARSHIPS

Scholarship application period ended March 22, 2022.

Undergraduates, graduate students, and postdocs from U.S. domestic colleges and universities are all eligible to apply for travel support scholarships. Applications will be accepted from March 1st-22nd, and we anticipate awarding scholarships by early April.

If selected, you will receive three (3) nights single-occupancy lodging at the Sheraton Pittsburgh Hotel at Station Square for the nights of June 13-15, and up to $500 for eligible travel-related expenses (e.g. airfare, taxi, meals). You will still be required to pay the workshop registration fee. If you are awarded a scholarship, IRIS will book your hotel room on your behalf.

HOTEL

Note: If you are a student scholarship recipient please do not book your hotel room. A single-occupancy hotel room will be booked on your behalf by IRIS.

Sheraton Pittsburgh Hotel at Station Square
300 W Station Square Dr
Pittsburgh, PA 15219
(412) 261-2000
Hotel Website

AIRPORT

The 2022 SAGE/GAGE Workshop will be held in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The nearest airport is Pittsburgh International Airport (PIT). The airport is located 18 miles (35 minutes) from the hotel.

GROUND TRANSPORTATION:

  • The Port Authority of Allegheny County is pleased to offer service to Pittsburgh International Airport via the West Busway (28X Airport Flyer). The route runs to and from PIT, Downtown Pittsburgh, Robinson Towne Center, and Oakland on a regular schedule.
  • Lyft/Uber range between approximately $40-$50/one way.
  • Taxis are also readily available at the airport to the Sheraton for around $50/one way (not including gratuity).

If you're driving to the hotel from PIT: Take 376 East to Exit 69C. Turn right and continue for approximately one mile. Turn right and follow sign for Route 51 North - McKees Rocks/West End. Be in the right lane at the light. At next T-intersection, turn right toward Carson Street. The hotel is approximately 1.5 miles on the left.

PARKING

On-site parking is available at the hotel for a fee of $30/day.

THINGS TO DO IN PITTSBURGH, PA

Workshop At-a-Glance:
Day 0 - Monday, June 13th - Pre-meeting short courses and field trip
Day 1 - Tuesday, June 14th - First full day of the workshop (plenaries, SIGs, posters)
Day 2 - Wednesday, June 15th - Second full day of the workshop
Day 3 - Thursday, June 16th - Final half-day of the workshop, concludes at noon

Day 0 - Monday, June 13, 2022

Monday, June 13th, 2022, 7am–8pm at Eastern Daylight Time (UTC/GMT -4 hours)

7:00 am
2:00 pm

Meeting Registration & Vaccination Verification

Please have your QR code from Crowdpass available for scanning.

8:30 am
5:00 pm

FIELD TRIP:  History and Geology of Southwestern Pennsylvania

Description: Join us for a day exploring the history and geology of southwestern Pennsylvania!  Participants will have the opportunity to explore the geology of Chestnut Ridge, visit a historic iron furnace and quarry, see a natural gas storage well, learn about a French and Indian War battlefield, and perhaps even catch a glimpse of the famous Frank Lloyd Wright home Fallingwater.  All this and more awaits during a field trip that will run from 9a to 5p on Monday, June 13th.  This trip will be led by University of Pittsburgh Professor Tom Anderson, who is also a member of the local Pittsburgh Geological Society.

Cost: $50 per person, includes transportation to/from the workshop hotel
We reserve the right to cancel the field trip if fewer than 7 participants sign up.

The field trip is now fully booked.  If you would like to be added to the waitlist, please email workshop@iris.edu.

***IMPORTANT*** If you plan to attend the field trip you will likely need to travel to Pittsburgh on Sunday, June 12th.

8:00 am
12:00 pm

SHORT COURSE: Creating StationXML: Introducing YASMINE and the New Nominal Response Library Web Service
Location: Haselton 1&2, 2nd floor

9:00 am
12:00 pm

SHORT COURSE: GNSS Interferometric Reflectometry & Earth Science Applications
Location: Woodlawn 1&2, 2nd floor

1:00 pm
5:00 pm

SHORT COURSE: GAMIT/GLOBK Refresher and Recent Developments
Location: Woodlawn 1&2, 2nd floor

1:00 pm
5:00 pm

SHORT COURSE: Using MsPASS for Processing Large Data Sets
Location: Elwood 1&2, 2nd floor

1:00 pm
5:00 pm

SHORT COURSE: Bring Your Own Identity to Access Geophysical Data
Location: Haselton 1&2, 2nd floor

1:00 pm
5:00 pm

SHORT COURSE: Magnetotellurics at PASSCAL, from deployment to data collection
Location: Brighton 1&2, 2nd floor

4:00 pm
7:00 pm

Meeting Registration & Vaccination Verification

Please have your QR code from Crowdpass available for scanning.

6:30 pm
8:00 pm

Welcome Event: Student and Early Career Mixer
Location:
Stoops Ferry, 2nd floor

6:30-6:45pm - First-time Attendee Welcome
This session is for any attendees, but particularly first-time attendees, who would like to learn a bit more about the organizations involved and what to expect during the meeting.

6:45-7:45pm - Student Networking Event
Is this your 1st (or 2nd) GAGE/SAGE workshop? Are you trying to get to know people in the geophysics community? Join us for this networking event specifically for students! This low pressure event will allow you some time to get to know your fellow attendees and develop some skills for talking about yourself and your work during the meeting.

Day 1 - Tuesday, June 14, 2022

Tuesday, June 14th, 2022, 7am–7pm at Eastern Daylight Time (UTC/GMT -4 hours)

7:00 am
5:00 pm

Meeting Registration & Vaccination Verification

Please have your QR code from Crowdpass available for scanning.

7:30 am

Beverage Service - Coffee & Tea

8:00 am
8:30 am

WELCOME & INTRODUCTORY REMARKS

  • Bob Woodward, IRIS President
  • Rick Aster, IRIS Board Chair
  • Ronni Grapenthin, UNAVCO Board Chair
  • Maggie Benoit, NSF EAR Program Director
  • Mike Jackson, NSF OPP Program Director

[This session will be available via a live stream]

8:30 am
10:15 am

PLENARY SESSION: New Horizons in Scope: Geophysics in Extreme and Unconventional Environments

Plenary Session Organizers: Nick Schmerr (University of Maryland) and Surendra Adhikari (NASA-JPL)

Plenary Session Speakers:

  • 8:35-9:00 AM: Ceri Nunn, NASA-JPL
    • Lunar Seismology - Past, Present, and Future (abstract)
  • 9:00-9:25 AM: Diana Roman, Carnegie Institution for Science
    • Geophysical Insights into Magmatic Processes: Recent Advances from Alaska and Latin America (abstract)
  • 9:25-9:50 AM: Kiya Riverman, University of Portland
    • Active-source seismology for imaging ice shelves and their cavities: revealing the goblins (abstract)
  • 9:50-10:15 AM: Kristin Poinar, University at Buffalo (abstract)
    • Insights into the processes behind current and future sea-level rise: Geophysics on the Greenland Ice Sheet

[This session will be available via a live stream]

10:15 am
10:45 am

COFFEE BREAK

10:45 am
12:15 pm

SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP BREAKOUT SESSIONS

  • Implementation of Cost Recovery for PASSCAL Instrumentation
    • Brighton 3&4, 2nd floor
  • Designing the Future of the GSN
    • Haselton 1&2, 2nd floor
  • Recharging the Ocean Bottom Seismometer Instrument Center (OBSIC): current progress and new opportunities
    • Elwood 1&2, 2nd floor
  • Teaching geophysics in-person and online: Sharing existing resources and soliciting instructional support needs
    • Woodlawn 1&2, 2nd floor

10:45 am
1:45 pm

TOWNHALL: Future of WInSAR

Organizer: Eric Lindsey, University of New Mexico & WInSAR Executive Committee Chair
Location: Brighton 1&2, 2nd floor

This townhall coincides with the Tuesday morning SIG sessions and will continue through the lunch hour as well.  Because a separate lunch will be offered for participants of the WInSAR townhall gathering, we kindly request that you register in advance if you plan to attend by sending a message to workshop@iris.edu.

12:15 pm
1:50 pm

Lunch

1:50 pm
3:45 pm

PLENARY SESSION: New Horizons in Impact: Geophysics for Environment, Climate, and Hazards, and Expanding the Reach of Geophysics

Plenary Session Organizers: Brent Minchew (MIT) and Zhigang Peng (Georgia Tech)

Plenary Session Speakers:

  • 2:05-2:30 PM: Michaela King, University of Washington
    • What’s in a Gigaton? Using detailed mapping of Greenland’s ice to better resolve and communicate ice sheet dynamics (abstract)
  • 2:30-2:55 PM: Shujuan Mao, Stanford University
    • Space-Time Monitoring of Groundwater Fluctuations via Passive Seismic Interferometry (abstract)
  • 2:55-3:20 PM: Julien Chaput, University of Texas at El Paso
    • Ice Ghosts: At the intersection of art, snow seismology, and public imagination (abstract)
  • 3:20-3:45 PM: Aditya Kar, Fort Valley State University
    • Impacts of a successful decadal partnership of IRIS and Fort Valley State University on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) in the geosciences (abstract)

[This session will be available via a live stream]

3:45 pm
4:15 pm

Break

4:15 pm
5:45 pm

POSTER SESSION

Poster size is 4' high x 8' wide

6:00 pm
7:00 pm

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Activity
Location:
Lunch Room (Grand Station 3&4, 1st floor)

Meritocracy Monopoly: Gaming your way to understanding privilege

Day 2 - Wednesday, June 15, 2022

Wednesday, June 15th, 2022, 7am–8pm at Eastern Daylight Time (UTC/GMT -4 hours)

7:00 am
8:00 am

Student & Early Career Networking Breakfast
Location:
Fountainview, 2nd floor

Are you a student or early career scientist? Come and join us for a delicious free breakfast! This is a great opportunity to get to know other early career researchers at the meeting, as well as chat with the leadership of the geophysical facilities and the NSF program managers. We will give a brief overview of the meeting, introduce you to key people within the facilities, and let you enjoy breakfast and casual conversation. (This would also be a great time to ask NSF any burning questions you may have!) See you there!

7:00 am
5:00 pm

Meeting Registration & Vaccination Verification

Please have your QR code from Crowdpass available for scanning.

7:30 am

Beverage Service - Coffee & Tea

8:00 am
8:30 am

Updates on New/Growing Community Initiatives & Capabilities

[This session will be available via a live stream]

8:30 am
10:15 am

PLENARY SESSION: New Horizons in Modeling: Geophysics Across Space and Time Scales

Plenary Session Organizers: Katie Cooper (Washington State) and Lucy Flesch (Purdue)

Plenary Session Speakers:

  • 8:35-9:00 AM: Alice Gabriel, UC San Diego
    • Supercomputing of large earthquakes (abstract)
  • 9:00-9:25 AM: Julie Elliot, Michigan State University
    • The 2020-2021 Alaska Earthquake Sequence: Coupling Segmentation, Stress Loading, and Slip Behavior (abstract)
  • 9:25-9:50 AM: Alireza Bahadori, LDEO/Columbia University
    • Investigating the lithosphere deformation and landscape evolution of the southwestern North America since the Late Eocene using numerical models (abstract)
  • 9:50-10:15 AM: Julianne Dannberg, University of Florida
    • Dynamics and composition of mantle plumes: Insights from connecting geodynamic models to seismic observations (abstract)

[This session will be available via a live stream]

10:15 am
10:45 am

Break

10:45 am
12:15 pm

SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP BREAKOUT SESSIONS

  • Subduction Zones in Four Dimensions: Progress in Developing the SZ4D Initiative
    • Woodlawn 1&2, 2nd floor
  • Common Cloud Platform: Progress Towards Cloud-based Data Services
    • Elwood 1&2, 2nd floor
  • Concepts for an NSF Instrument Facility (IF): Collaboration and Improvement of UAS Services for the NSF community
    • Brighton 1&2, 2nd floor
  • Mentorship Pathways in International Collaborations
    • Haselton 1&2, 2nd floor
  • Visioning a DAS facility to advance SAGE-GAGE Science
    • Brighton 3&4, 2nd floor

12:15 pm
2:00 pm

Group Photo & Lunch

2:00 pm
3:45 pm

PLENARY SESSION: New Horizons in Approach: The Intersection of Disciplines

Plenary Session Organizers: Susan Bilek (New Mexico Tech) and Andy Newman (Georgia Tech)

Plenary Session Speakers:

  • 2:05-2:30 PM: Esteban Bowles-Martinez, Oregon State
    • Magnetotellurics in Cascadia and beyond: resistivity studies of volcanoes, faults, and subduction tectonics (abstract)
  • 2:30-2:55 PM: Dara Goldberg, USGS
    • Generous to a fault: How including both seismic and geodetic datasets improves earthquake slip characterization (abstract)
  • 2:55-3:20 PM: Alicia Hotovec-Ellis, USGS
    • Using earthquake-derived seismic velocity changes to monitor strain at volcanoes (abstract)
  • 3:20-3:45 PM: Junle Jiang, University of Oklahoma
    • Geodetic pursuit of aseismic forces for micro-earthquake processes (abstract)

[This session will be available via a live stream]

3:45 pm
4:15 pm

Break

4:15 pm
5:45 pm

POSTER SESSION

5:45 pm
6:15 pm

Break

6:15 pm
7:45 pm

GROUP DINNER

Day 3 - Thursday, June 16, 2022

Thursday, June 16th, 2022, 7am–12pm at Eastern Daylight Time (UTC/GMT -4 hours)

7:00 am
8:00 am

GAGE/SAGE Governance Breakfast
Location:
Brighton 1-4, 2nd floor

For current members of GAGE and SAGE governance committees.

7:00 am
11:00 am

Meeting Registration & Vaccination Verification

Please have your QR code from Crowdpass available for scanning.

7:30 am

Beverage Service - Coffee & Tea

8:00 am
9:00 am

PANEL DISCUSSION: Insights for Advisors and Students: Non-academic Career Paths for Geophysicists

Helpful links and resources

[This session will be available via a live stream]

9:00 am
10:45 am

PLENARY SESSION: New Horizons in Observation: Innovative Data Collection and Analysis

Plenary Session Organizers: Karianne Bergen (Brown) and Herb Wang (Wisconsin)

Plenary Session Presenters:

  • 9:05-9:30 AM: Harrison Martin, Indiana University
    • Quantifying geomorphic change using drone-based lidar (abstract)
  • 9:30-9:55 AM: Xiaowei Chen, University of Oklahoma
    • Using joint DAS-Nodal array to better understand local seismicity and shallow structure in Northern Oklahoma (abstract)
  • 9:55-10:20 AM: Nate Lindsey, Fiber Sense
    • Fiber in the ocean – Update on the impact and diversification of
      subsea fiber sensing (abstract)
  • 10:20-10:45 AM: Sydney Dybing, University of Oregon
    • Detecting Earthquakes in Noisy Real-Time GNSS Data with Machine Learning for Earthquake and Tsunami Early Warning (abstract)

[This session will be available via a live stream]

10:45 am
11:15 am

Break

11:15 am
11:45 am

SAGE/GAGE Governance Session

11:45 am
12:00 pm

Closing Remarks

NOTE: Fields marked with * are required.

WORKSHOP REGISTRATION FEES

  • Attendee: $350
  • Students and Postdocs: $175
  • Virtual: $50
  • Guest (age 16+): $100

LATE REGISTRATION (May 19th - June 6th)

  • Attendee: $400
  • Students and Postdocs: $200
  • Virtual: $50

REFUNDS

  • 100% refund until the May 18th registration deadline
  • 50% refund until June 6th
  • No refunds issued after June 6th (COVID exception)
  • We are unable to offer refunds for virtual registrations
  • Request a Refund

Please note that all persons attending the SAGE/GAGE Workshop in person will need to upload proof of vaccination via a secure third-party site before coming to Pittsburgh. There will be no on-site registration available for this year’s workshop.

 
 

Address

 
 

Emergency Contact

 

Workshop Specific Questions

e.g. (they/them) (she/her) (he/him)
 
If so, a 4'x8' poster board will be reserved for you at the meeting.
$100 per guest, ages 16+
List guests names for name badges. Guest per line.
 
 

Group Dinner

Wed, June 15th (~6-8pm)
It is our pleasure to meet your dietary needs, and we are usually able to accommodate most dietary restrictions. Please note that dietary "preferences" are not the same as genuine restrictions, such as a medical food allergy or religious reasons. All meals served (with the exception of the dinner on Wednesday night) at the workshop will be in buffet-style, and we will make every effort to identify ingredients that may trigger adverse reactions for individuals with food allergies or intolerance. To ensure your health and safety, special meal requests will be tracked through your registration and relayed to the catering staff.
 
We aim to have a fully accessible workshop. Please share any accommodations that will better enable your full participation in the workshop (e.g. hearing or sight impairments, etc.).
You can also indicate if you would like an organizer to reach out to you and discuss.
 

Field trip

Description: Join us for a day exploring the history and geology of southwestern Pennsylvania! Participants will have the opportunity to explore the geology of Chestnut Ridge, visit a historic iron furnace and quarry, see a natural gas storage well, learn about a French and Indian War battlefield, and perhaps even catch a glimpse of the famous Frank Lloyd Wright home Fallingwater. All this and more awaits during a field trip that will run from 9a to 5p on Monday, June 13th. If you plan to attend the field trip you will likely need to travel to Pittsburgh on Sunday, June 12th.
This trip will be led by University of Pittsburgh Professor Tom Anderson, who is also a member of the local Pittsburgh Geological Society.
Cost: $50 per person, includes transportation to/from the workshop hotel
We reserve the right to cancel the field trip if fewer than 7 participants sign up.

The field trip is currently full. Please email workshop@iris.edu if you would like to be added to the waitlist.

 

Short Courses

All short courses are scheduled for Monday, June 13th which is the day prior to the official workshop start. If you plan to attend these short courses you will likely need to travel to Pittsburgh on Sunday, June 12th. You can sign up for short courses now by checking the appropriate box(es) below, or if you would like to sign up later, please do so by emailing workshop@iris.edu. All short courses are free to attend, but some require you to bring a laptop. For details about each course refer to the Day 0 schedule under the Agenda tab above.

 

COVID acknowledgment

I have read and understand the protocols that IRIS/UNAVCO has put in place to help protect all workshop staff and participants and reduce the spread of illness including COVID-19. I agree to follow all protocols and will NOT attend any workshop event if I test positive or develop symptoms during the workshop or within 5 days of the start of the workshop, or as otherwise recommended by the CDC which is subject to change at the agency’s discretion.

In person attendance at any of the workshop events is strictly voluntary and IRIS/UNAVCO is not responsible for any claims arising from contraction of COVID-19 or other communicable diseases.

 

Terms and Conditions

I agree to grant IRIS/UNAVCO permission to record film/video and/or take pictures of my participation in the SAGE/GAGE Workshop. I further agree that any or all of the material photographed may be used as part of any future IRIS/UNAVCO publications, brochures, other printed materials, or on IRIS's or UNAVCO's website(s). I also agree to grant IRIS/UNAVCO permission to publish my contact information (name and institution) on the workshop website, as an active participant in the workshop, so that other participants may contact me.

 
 
Individuals from low and low-middle income countries may request fee waiver code from workshop@iris.edu. Fee waiver will be applied at the checkout.

 

 

Notice:
The abstract submission period for this workshop closed at Wed, May 18, 2022 - 11:59:00 PM.

Notice:
The whitepaper submission period for this workshop closed at .

Notice:
The webinar registration period for this workshop closed at .

A list of attendees is not yet available.

Notice:
The scholarship application period for this workshop closed at Tue, March 22, 2022 - 11:59:00 PM.

In preparation for the 2022 SAGE/GAGE Workshop, we have implemented a number of steps to ensure the maximum level of safety and protection for in-person workshop participants.  This page is regularly updated so participants can easily stay informed on the evolving safety practices and policies we have in place.

Our COVID safety policy is built around a three-pronged strategy: Vax, Mask, and Test

Vax

  • Only individuals with CDC-designated up-to-date COVID-19 vaccinations will be permitted to attend the workshop in person

  • All in-person participants must submit proof of their vaccination status via a secure third-party portal prior to the start of the workshop

  • Individuals who do not or cannot provide proof of up-to-date COVID-19 vaccination status are encouraged to participate in the workshop virtually via our virtual registration option

Mask

  • All in-person participants will be required to wear masks while indoors, unless they are giving a presentation, or actively eating or drinking

Test

  • On-site rapid test kits will be available at no cost for any participants who feel unwell and/or have COVID-like symptoms
  • Attendees who test positive during or within 5 days prior to the workshop must refrain from all in-person workshop participation and follow CDC guidance on quarantine and isolation

Additional steps we are taking include

  • To the extent possible, participant seating will be arranged with an eye toward maintaining social distancing (e.g. in the plenary hall, or in breakout rooms)

External Resources for COVID Information

CDC's COVID-19 website
CDC guidance for travelers
City of Pittsburgh COVID-19 Information
Pittsburgh area COVID-19 testing locations

Posterboard size is 4 feet high x 8 feet wide

Tuesday Poster Session (June 14, 2022, 4:15-5:45pm ET)

Listed by posterboard number

  1. Seismic body-wave velocity and attenuation tomography of the upper mantle and crust beneath Alaska
    Cristhian Salas, University of California Santa Barbara; Zachary Eilon, University of California Santa Barbara
  2. Seismic Constraints on the Structure of Alaska: A Review
    Xiaotao Yang, Purdue University; Michael Everett Mann, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Gary Pavlis, Indiana University; S. Shawn Wei, Michigan State University; Karen Fischer, Brown University; Margarete Jadamec, University at Buffalo; Andrew Scheaffer, Geological Survey of Canada Pacific Division
  3. Azimuthal Anisotropy along the Alaska Subduction Zone from Earthquake and Ambient Noise Rayleigh Waves
    Zongshan Li, Washington University in St. Louis; Douglas Wiens, Washington University in St. Louis
  4. Incoming Plate Seismicity and Relation to the Seismic Cycle at the Alaska Subduction Zone
    Patrick Matulka, Washington University in St. Louis; Zongshan Li, Washington University in St. Louis; Doug Wiens, Washington University in St. Louis; Grace Barcheck, Cornell University; Geoff Abers, Cornell University; Natalia, Ruppert, Alaska Earthquake Center
  5. Seismic velocity structure near 2020-2021 major earthquakes at the Alaska Peninsula
    Fan Wang, Michigan State University; S. Shawn Wei, Michigan State University; Connor Drooff, Michigan State University; Julie Elliott, Michigan State University; Jeffrey T. Freymueller, Michigan State University; Natalia Ruppert, University of Alaska Fairbanks; Haijiang Zhang, University of Science and Technology of China
  6. Increasing the usability of ocean-bottom seismometer data: The OBSIC metrics website
    Andrew Barclay, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; John Collins, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
  7. Novel Autonomous and Cabled OBS Solutions for Offshore Seismic Research
    James Lindsey, Guralp
  8. Variations in ground motion amplification on the Cascadia submarine forearc from short-period OBS recordings of intra-Gorda plate earthquakes
    Nathan Miller, USGS; Pablo Canales, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
  9. Small-scale convection tomographically imaged beneath the Pacific plate using a dense OBS array
    Zachary Eilon, University of California Santa Barbara; Lun Zhang, University of California Santa Barbara; James Gaherty, Northern Arizona University; Donald Forsyth, Brown University; Joshua Russell, Brown University
  10. Surface-Wave Anisotropy of Old Oceanic Lithosphere and Asthenosphere in the Southwest Pacific
    Joseph Phillips, Northern Arizona University; James B. Gaherty, Northern Arizona University; Joshua B. Russell, Brown University; Zachary C. Eilon, University of California Santa Barbara; Donald W. Forsyth, Brown University; Joseph S. Byrnes, Northern Arizona University
  11. Pacific upper-mantle shear attenuation and velocity from ocean-bottom observations and implications for asthenospheric temperature and melt
    Joshua Russell, Brown University; Colleen Dalton, Brown University
  12. Waveform Modeling of Seismo-Acoustic Records from MERMAID Instruments in the Pacific
    Sirawich Pipatprathanporn, Princeton University; Frederik Simons, Princeton University; Joel Simon, Princeton University; Jessica Irving, University of Bristol
  13. The 15 January 2022 Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai Eruption as Recorded by MERMAID
    Frederik Simons, Princeton University; Joel D. Simon, Princeton University; Yong Yu, SUSTECH; Sirawich Pipatprathanporn, Princeton University; Jessica C.E. Irving, Bristol University
  14. Bridge Asynchronous Seismic Observations with Ambient Noise Three-station Interferometry
    Shun Zhang, University of Colorado Boulder; Michael H. Ritzwoller, University of Colorado Boulder
  15. U-CORS: An Underwater Continuously Operating Reference Station for Deep Seafloor Geodesy
    Terance J. Schuh, Princeton University; Frederik J. Simons, Princeton University; Hayden Radke, DBV Technology; Harold T. Vincent, DBV Technology
  16. A Bedrock GNSS Network for Continuous Measurement of Glacial Discharge
    Surendra Adhikari, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
  17. Seismoelectric exploration of an englacial aquifer on the Greenland Ice Sheet
    Kristin Poinar, University at Buffalo; Courtney Shafer, University at Buffalo
  18. Detecting and Estimating Position Biases due to Ice in GNSS Antennas
    Peter Matheny, The Ohio State University; Demian Gomez; David Saddler; Eric Kendrick; Stephanie Konfal; Terry Wilson; Michael Bevis
  19. Icequake Scaling and Periodicity at a Rift on the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica
    Kathrine Udell Lopez, University of Maryland; Mong-Han Huang, University of Maryland; Vedran Lekic, University of Maryland; Kira Olsen, University of Maryland and Goddard Space Flight Center
  20. Geothermal Heat Flux Estimation Across Antarctica and Its Implication for Ice-bedrock Interface Condition
    Shun Zhang, University of Colorado Boulder; Michael H. Ritzwoller, University of Colorado Boulder
  21. UKANET: interrogating Earth rheology in Antarctica via GNSS measurements of the response to surface mass balance anomalies
    Pippa Whitehouse, Durham University; Achraf Koulali, Newcastle University; Peter Clarke, Newcastle University; Mike Bentley, Durham University; Grace Nield, Durham University; Terry Wilson and POLENET partners, Ohio State University; Matt King, University of Tasmania; Michiel van den Broeke, Utrecht University; Bert Wouters, Utrecht University; and project partners at UNAVCO and British Antarctic Survey
  22. Earthquake -- Slow Slip Interactions: a 2017 example from Costa Rica
    Mahsa Afra, University of South Florida; Mitchell Hastings, University of South Florida; Surui Xie, University of California; Nicholas Voss, University of South Florida; Esteban Chaves, Observatorio Vulcanologico y Sismologico de Costa Rica; Cyril Muller, Observatorio Vulcanologico y Sismologico de Costa Rica; Marino Protti, Observatorio Vulcanologico y Sismologico de Costa Rica; Rocco Malservisi, University of South Florida; Timothy Dixon, University of South Florida; Alvaro Alvarez Calderon, Instituto Geografico Nacional
  23. Detection and Characterization of Very Low Frequency Earthquakes in the Cascadia Slip Transition Zone Part I: Transcontinental Wavefields from the Transportable Array
    Wenyuan Fan, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego; Andrew J. Barbour, U.S. Geological Survey; Jeffrey J. McGuire, U.S. Geological Survey; Yihe Huang, University of Michigan; Guoqing Lin, University of Miamil; Elizabeth S. Cochran, U.S. Geological Survey; Ryo Okuwaki, University of Tsukuba, Japan
  24. Detection and Characterization of Very Low Frequency Earthquakes in the Cascadia Slip Transition Zone: Part II: Crustal Deformation from the Plate Boundary Observatory Strainmeter Network
    Andrew J. Barbour, U.S. Geological Survey; Wenyuan Fan, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego; Jeffrey J. McGuire, U.S. Geological Survey
  25. Offshore very low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs) in Cascadia -- frictional patchwork in seismogenic zone?
    Abhijit Ghosh, University of California, Riverside; Kuntal Chaudhuri, University of California, Riverside
  26. New Science Project in Japan: Science of Slow-to-Fast Earthquakes
    Satoshi Ide, University of Tokyo; Yohei Hamada, JAMSTEC; Asuka Yamaguchi, AORI Univ. Tokyo; Yoshihiro Ito, DPRI Kyoto Univ.; Yoshiyuki Tanaka, Dept EPS Univ. Tokyo; Aitaro Kato, ERI Univ. Tokyo; Takanori Matsuzawa, NIED
  27. Processing techniques for optimizing the detectability of synthetic shallow slow slip events in seafloor pressure data from the Alaska margin
    Erik Fredrickson, University of Washington; Joan Gomberg, US Geological Survey; William Wilcock, University of Washington; Susan Hautala, University of Washington; Albert Hermann, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory; H. Paul Johnson, University of Washington
  28. Short-Term Slow Slip Events at Alaska Subduction Zone and their Association with Tremors in the Vicinity
    Dhamsith Weerasinghe, Bowling Green State University; Yuning Fu, Bowling Green State University
  29. Converted-wave elastic reverse time migration imaging of the Cascadia Subduction Zone
    Leah Langer, USGS; Fred Pollitz; Jeff McGuire; Paul Bodin
  30. Mapping out spatial variability in the subduction plate interface properties using high frequency P-to-S mode conversions
    Kiara Daly, Cornell University; Geoffrey Abers, Cornell University
  31. Estimating objective locking distributions of the Kamchatka subduction zone from GNSS data using a modified Metropolis-Hastings approach
    Gareth Funning, University of California, Riverside
  32. Evidence for Caribbean Plate subduction in Southern Costa Rica
    James Bourke, Rutgers University; Vadim Levin, Rutgers University; Ivonne Arroyo, Rutgers University; Lepolt Linkimer, Rutgers University
  33. Advances in real-time GPS monitoring of locked segments of the Nazca/South America megathrust subduction zone, for tsunami early-warning in Ecuador
    Patricia Mothes, Instituto Geofisico, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Quito Ecuador; Sandro Vaca, Instituto Geofisico, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Quito Ecuador; Wilson Acero, Instituto Geofisico, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Quito Ecuador; Andres Herrera, Instituto Geofisico, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Quito Ecuador; Brendan W. Crowell, Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA; Jorge Aguilar, Instituto Geofisico, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Quito Ecuador; Monica Segovia, Instituto Geofisico, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Quito Ecuador
  34. Modeling Mechanisms for trench parallel flow in the Cocos-Nazca Subduction System
    Bailey Valint, University at Buffalo; Margarete Jadamec, University at Buffalo
  35. Strain partitioning and the accommodation of oblique convergence along the Queen Charlotte Fault
    Olumide Adedeji, University of New Mexico; Lindsay Lowe Worthington, University of New Mexico; Emily C Roland, Western Washington University; Maureen A L Walton, Naval Research Lab; Mladen R Nedimovic, Dalhousie University; Collin Brandl, University of New Mexico; Lazaro Garza, Western Washington University; Jose Castillo Castellanos, Dalhousie University
  36. Effect of Plate Coupling and Initial Slab Dip on Dynamic Weakening in the Asthenosphere
    Vivek Bhavsar, University at Buffalo SUNY; Margarete Jadamec, University at Buffalo SUNY; Matthew Knepley, University at Buffalo SUNY
  37. Investigating the Mechanics of Strain Partitioning at the Rakhine-Bangladesh Megathrust Using InSAR Time-series
    Jeng-Hann Chong, University of New Mexico; Eric Lindsey, University of New Mexico
  38. A Joint Inversion Algorithm of GNSS and InSAR Data for Surface 3-D Velocity and Strain Rate Fields
    Jeonghyeop Kim, Stony Brook University; Mradula Vashishtha, Stony Brook University; William Holt, Stony Brook University
  39. Controls on Strain Accommodation in Rift Development across the Turkana Depression
    Martin Musila, Tulane University; Cynthia Ebinger; Ian Bastow; Rebecca Bendick; Garrett Sullivan; Rita Kounoudis; Chris Ogden
  40. Regional Stress Variations in Southeast Asia
    Prakash Timsina, New Mexico State University; Thomas Hearn, New Mexico State University; James Ni, New Mexico State University
  41. Constraints on crustal stress for South Island, New Zealand
    Olivia Walbert, University of Michigan; Eric Hetland, University of Michigan
  42. Spatiotemporal variations of stress and strain in the crust near 2019 Ridgecrest Earthquake Sequence
    Niloufar Abolfathian, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology; Eric Fielding, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology
  43. Displaced rocks as an indicator of ground motion during the 4 July 2019 M6.4 Ridgecrest earthquake
    Malinda Zuckerman, Arizona State University; Jacqueline Caplan-Auerbach, Western Washington University; J Ramon Arrowsmith, Arizona State University; Colin Amos, Western Washington University
  44. Leveraging Robotics and AI for Geosciences: Rock Search, Mapping, and Dynamic Analysis
    Zhiang Chen, Arizona State University; Jnaneshwar Das, Arizona State University; Ramon Arrowsmith, Arizona State University
  45. Imaging the rupture process and postseismic deformation of the 2019 Ridgecrest earthquake sequence with high-resolution geodetic data
    Kang Wang, University of California Berkeley; Roland Burgmann, University of California Berkeley
  46. Insights on earthquake source processes from the azimuthal variation of the 2019 Ridgecrest earthquake source spectra
    Meichen Liu, University of Michigan; Jing Ci Neo, University of Michigan; Yihe Huang, University of Michigan
  47. Insight into Earthquake Source Processes from Large Moment Tensor Catalogs
    Boris Rösler, Northwestern University; Seth Stein, Northwestern University
  48. The 2020 Mw 7.0 Neon Karlovasion (Samos) Earthquake: Source characteristics from joint inversion (GNSS, InSAR and ground motion) and tsunami energetics
    Yu-Sheng Sun, University of Oregon; Diego Melgar, University of Oregon; Angel Ruiz Angulo, University of Iceland; Athanassios Ganas, National Observatory of Athens, Institute of Geodynamics; Tuncay Taymaz, Istanbul Technical University; Brendan Crowell, University of Washington; Xiaohua Xu, University of Texas, Institute for Geophysics; Varvara Tsironi, National Observatory of Athens, Institute of Geodynamics; Ilektra Karasante, National Observatory of Athens, Institute of Geodynamics; Seda Yolsal-Cevikbilen, Istanbul Technical University; Tuna Eken, Istanbul Technical University
  49. Using Bayesian seismic refraction and electrical resistivity to study critical zone science and near-surface geophysics
    Mong-Han Huang, University of Maryland; Berit Hudson Rasmussen, University of Maryland; Jonathan Perkins, U.S. Geological Survey; Kathrine Udell Lopez, University of Maryland
  50. Geophysical Investigations of Impact-Induced Porosity
    Peter James, Baylor University
  51. Defining research and teaching priorities that could be advanced through a Near-Surface Geophysics (NSG) Center
    Sarah Kruse, University of South Florida; Xavier Comas, Florida Atlantic University; Brooks Hanson, AGU; Kennedy Doro, University of Toledo; Tiffani Holmes, Fort Valley State University; Rosemary Knight, Stanford University; Burke Minsley, USGS; John McDaris, Carleton College; Isabel Morris, New Mexico Tech; Veronica Rodriquez Tribaldos, LBL; Lee Slater, Rutgers University; Victor Tsai, Brown University; Chi Zhang, University of Vienna
  52. The IGUaNA modules: Teaching Geophysics with Societally-Relevant Questions in Introductory-Level Courses
    Sarah Kruse, University of South Florida; Andy Parsekian, University of Wyoming; Lee Slater, Rutgers University; Carol Ormand, Carleton College; Danielle Sumy, IRIS; John Taber, IRIS
  53. Using Introductory level Geoscience Instruction to Analyze the face of Geology through 3D Visualization
    Gillian Goldhagen, University of California, Riverside; Kinnari Atit, University of California, Riverside; Heather A. Ford, University of California, Riverside
  54. Data-rich and societally-oriented geodesy curricular modules: design inputs and actual use patterns
    Beth Pratt-Sitaula, UNAVCO; Kristin O'Connell, Science Education Resource Center; Becca Walker, Mt San Antonio College; Bruce James Douglas, Indiana University; Benjamin Crosby, Idaho State University; Donna Charlevoix, UNAVCO
  55. Status of Canada's Earthquake Early Warning Project
    Yuan Lu, Canadian Hazards Information Service of Natural Resources Canada; Henry Seywerd, Canadian Hazards Information Service of Natural Resources Canada; Stephen Crane, Canadian Hazards Information Service of Natural Resources Canada; Charles Blais, Canadian Hazards Information Service of Natural Resources Canada; Lisa Nykolaishen, Canadian Hazards Information Service of Natural Resources Canada; Lorne McKee, Canadian Hazards Information Service of Natural Resources Canada; John Adams, Canadian Hazards Information Service of Natural Resources Canada; Alison Bird, Canadian Hazards Information Service of Natural Resources Canada
  56. NSF SAGE-Facility Begins Procurement of Rapid Response Instrumentation
    Justin Sweet, IRIS; Kent Anderson, IRIS; Anne Meltzer, Lehigh University; Bob Woodward, IRIS
     

Wednesday Poster Session (June 15, 2022, 4:15-5:45pm ET)

Listed by posterboard number

  1. A Study in Opportunistic Underwater Acoustics: Exploring the Interdisciplinary Value in Community DAS Data
    Agatha Podrasky, Silixa LLC; David Podrasky, Silixa LLC; Noah Clayton, Silixa LLC; Thomas Coleman, Silixa LLC
  2. Towards near-surface monitoring by distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) and traffic noise
    Rafal Czarny, The Pennsylvania State University; Tieyuan Zhu, The Pennsylvania State University
  3. Toward near-surface characterization using Distributed Acoustic Sensing and ambient seismic noise in an urban area: Granada, Spain
    Yang Li, University of Michigan; Zack Spica, University of Michigan; Beatriz Gaite, National Geographic Institute of Spain; Sandra Ruiz-Barajas, National Geographic Institute of Spain
  4. Preliminary Outcome Evaluation of a Surface DAS Array to Monitor Seismic Activity at the FORGE Geothermal Facility in April 2022
    Manuel Mendoza, University of Colorado Boulder; Anne F. Sheehan, University of Colorado Boulder; Ge Jin, Colorado School of Mines; Kris Pankow, University of Utah
  5. Storm-induced signals are sensed by DAS fiber-optic sensors
    Junzhu Shen, The Pennsylvania State University; Tieyuan Zhu, The Pennsylvania State University
  6. Detecting seismic phases from Tonga deep earthquakes using deep learning
    Songqiao Wei, Michigan State University; Ziyi Xi, Michigan State University; Fan Wang, Michigan State University; Nooshin Saloor, Michigan State University; Weiqiang Zhu, California Institute of Technology; Gregory C. Beroza, Stanford University
  7. Supervised Deep Learning Models to Improve the Yellowstone Seismic Catalog
    Alysha Armstrong, University of Utah; Ben Baker, University of Utah; Keith Koper, University of Utah
  8. Real-time Deep Earthquake Discriminator Using Radiated Energy flux features and Machine Learning Methods
    Louisa Barama, Georgia Institute of Technology; Andrew Newman, Georgia Institute of Technology
  9. Using machine learning to improve earthquake catalogs for amphibious seismic networks: Application of EarthquakeTransformer to the Alaska Amphibious Community Seismic Experiment
    Grace Barcheck, Cornell University; Geoff Abers, Cornell University; Natalia Ruppert, University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Emily Roland, Western Washington University; Susan Schwartz, University of California, Santa Cruz
  10. Detecting and locating aftershocks for the 2020 Mw 6.5 Stanley, Idaho earthquake using convolutional neural networks
    Bingxu Luo, The University of Texas at Dallas; Hejun Zhu, The University of Texas at Dallas; Jidong Yang, China University of Petroleum; Thorne Lay, University of California, Santa Cruz; Lingling Ye, Southern University of Science and Technology; Zhong Lu, Southern Methodist University; David Lumley, The University of Texas at Dallas
  11. Systematic Detection of Microearthquakes During Several Moderate-Size Earthquake Sequences in Central and Eastern United States
    Zhigang Peng, Georgia Tech; Miguel Neves, Georgia Tech; Clara Daniels, Georgia Tech; Qiushi Zhai, Georgia Tech; Lindsay Chuang, Georgia Tech; Steve Jaume, College of Charleston
  12. A New Pilot Magnetotelluric Study of the Axial Fault Region of the New Madrid Seismic Zone
    Kaushik Sarker, Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI), University of Memphis; Chris H. Cramer, CERI, University of Memphis; Charles A. Langston, CERI, University of Memphis
  13. Normalizing flows for density estimation and uncertainty quantification in Earth data
    Peter Van Katwyk, Brown University; Karianne Bergen, Brown University
  14. Investigating load-induced elastic Earth deformation using a homogeneous, non-gravitating half-space method and a homogeneous, gravitating, spherical method
    Ashlesha Khatiwada, University of Montana; Hilary Martens, University of Montana; Donald Argus, Jet Propulsion Laboratory
  15. Hydrological loading deformation around Lake Mead, Nevada-Arizona, USA
    Esther Oyedele, Bowling Green State University; Yuning Fu, Bowling Green State University; Hilary Martens, University of Montana
  16. Quantifying the Spatial Resolution Limitations and Optimal Network Distribution for GNSS Water Storage Estimates Inferred from Earth Surface Displacements
    Matthew Swarr, University of Montana; Hilary Martens, University of Montana
  17. An Elastic Impact Model of High-Frequency Earthquake Radiation: Predictions and Observational Constraints
    Victor Tsai, Brown University; Greg Hirth, Brown University; Daniel T. Trugman, University of Nevada Reno; Shanna X. Chu, United States Geological Survey
  18. Seismic Coda Correlation for Constraining Lunar Seismic Discontinuities
    Liwei Liu, Rice University; Alan Levander, Rice University
  19. SIO/JPL NASA MEaSUREs Project Products and Visualization Tools
    Yehuda Bock, Scripps Institute of Oceanography (SIO); Angelyn Moore, JPL/Caltech; Donald Argus, JPL/Caltech; Peng Fang, SIO; Dorian; Golriz, SIO; Katherine Guns, SIO; Songnian Jiang, SIO; Alistair Knox, SIO; Zhen Liu, JPL/Caltech; Anne Sullivan, SIO
  20. An assessment of low-cost GNSS equipment for high-precision geophysical geodesy
    Michael Floyd, MIT; Gareth Funning, University of California, Riverside
  21. Interseismic fault loading in California's North Coast constrained by geodetic data
    Kathryn Materna, USGS; Jessica Murray, USGS Earthquake Science Center; Fred Pollitz, USGS Earthquake Science Center; Jason Patton, California Geological Survey
  22. A dense geodetic block model of western continental United States deformation
    Eileen Evans, California State University, Northridge
  23. Towards a uniform crustal thermal model of the continental US: a Monte Carlo approach
    Siyuan Sui, Stony Brook University; Weisen Shen, Stony Brook University; Oliver Boyd, USGS
  24. Three-Dimensional dynamics of asthenospheric flow and plate motion in the Boso Triple Junction: Phase I model construction
    Jane Halfhill, University at Buffalo SUNY; Margarete Jadamec, University at Buffalo SUNY
  25. From mega-thrusts to plate reorganizations: Bridging scales from local to global in forward and adjoint models
    Michael Gurnis, Caltech; Johann Rudi; Jiashun Hu; Georg Stadler
  26. GEOPHYSICAL IMPLICATIONS OF IMPROVED DYNAMIC TOPOGRAPHY ESTIMATES USING ASPECT
    Karen Williams, Virginia Tech; D. Sarah Stamps; Jacqueline Austermann; Scott King; Emmanuel Njinju
  27. P-wave attenuation tomography of the Tonga-Lau mantle wedge improved by a Bayesian Monte Carlo approach and independently constrained source spectra
    Yurong Zhang, Michigan State University; Joseph Byrnes, Northern Arizona University; S. Shawn Wei, Michigan State University; Dongdong Tian, Michigan State University; Fan Wang, Michigan State University; Maximiliano Bezada, University of Minnesota
  28. Mantle structure and flow across the continent-ocean transition of eastern North America from a suite of seismic data types
    Brennan Brunsvik, University of California Santa Barbara; Zachary Eilon, University of California Santa Barbara; Colton Lynner, University of Delaware
  29. A Global Veneer of Subducted Materials along the Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary
    Samantha Hansen, University of Alabama; Edward Garnero, Arizona State University; Mingming Li, Arizona State University; Sang-Heon Shim, Arizona State University; Sebastian Rost, The University of Leeds
  30. Excitation of Earth's Inner Core Rotational Oscillation During 2001-2003 Captured by Earthquake Doublets
    Keith Koper, University of Utah; Guanning Pang, Cornell University
  31. Regional Full Waveform Inversion with Source Encoding
    Congyue Cui, Princeton University; Jeroen Tromp; Etienne Bachmann; Daniel Peter
  32. Nnodes: a workflow manager for full waveform inversion in large scale HPC clusters
    Congyue Cui, Princeton University; Jeroen Tromp; Lucas Sawade
  33. Constructing a 3-D crustal velocity model for Oklahoma using full waveform inversion
    Shuo Zhang, The University of Texas at Dallas; Hejun Zhu, The University of Texas at Dallas
  34. Seismic Imaging of the Ups and Downs of the North American Midcontinent
    Xiaotao Yang, Purdue University; Lijun Liu, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Andrea Stevens Goddard, Indiana University Bloomington
  35. Wavelet Compression and Error Analyses on Processing in Wavelet Domain
    Abdul Hafiz Issah, Colorado School of Mines; Eileen R. Martin
  36. Seismic Data Management and Processing with MsPASS
    Yinzhi Wang, Texas Advanced Computing Center; Gary Pavlis, Indiana University
  37. Long memory: seismological evidence of lithospheric deformation 1 billion years ago.
    Vadim Levin, Rutgers University; Huaiyu Yuan, Macquarie University; Andrew Hynes, McGill University
  38. Lithospheric structure above the Northern Appalachian Anomaly: Constraints from the NEST experiment
    Kimberly Espinal, Yale University; Maureen Long, Yale University; Vadim Levin, Rutgers University; Paul Karabinos, Williams College; Roberto Masis Arce, Rutgers University; Yantao Luo, Yale University
  39. Monte-Carlo joint inversion of crustal architecture: incorporating local amplifications
    Hanxiao Wu, Stony Brook University; Weisen Shen, Stony Brook University; Fan-Chi Lin, University of Utah
  40. Seismic constraints on lithospheric structure and behavior in the southwestern United States
    Eva Golos, Brown University; Brennan Brunsvik, University of California - Santa Barbara; Zachary Eilon, University of California - Santa Barbara; Karen M. Fischer, Brown University
  41. Instantaneous stress state of the lithosphere of S. California: A synthesis of geophysical and compositional products of SCEC
    William Holt, Stony Brook University; Weisen Shen; Siyuan Sui; Lajhon Campbell; Ali Bahadori
  42. Generalized Radon Transform Migration across the Indo-Burman Accretionary Margin
    Christopher Carchedi, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University; James Gaherty, Northern Arizona University; Stephane Rondenay University of Bergen, Norway; Rasheed Ajala, Lousiana State University; Patricia Persaud, Lousiana State University; Md. Samiul Alim, University of Dhaka, Bangladesh; Syed Humayun Akhter, Bangladesh Open University, Bangladesh; Eric Sandvol, University of Missouri - Columbia; Michael Steckler, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University
  43. Resolving Lithospheric Structure beneath southern New England with Multiple Seismic Imaging Techniques
    Yantao Luo, Yale University; Maureen Long, Yale University; Stephane Rondenay, University of Bergen; Paul Karabinos, Williams Collegel; Yvette Kuiper, Colorado School of Mines
  44. A Closer Look at the Offset in Crustal Thickness Beneath Northwestern Massachusetts
    Roberto Masis Arce, Rutgers University; Yantao Luo; Kimberly Espinal; Yiran Li; Vadim Levin; Maureen Long; Paul Karabinos
  45. Effects of 3D velocity structure and Earth curvature on moment tensors from regional waveform modeling -- preliminary results for a case study in Iran
    Felix Rodriguez Cardozo, University of South Florida; Jochen Braunmiller, University of South Florida; Glenn Thompson, University of South Florida
  46. Large Lithospheric Velocity Variations Across the Northern Canadian Cordillera Imaged by Ambient Noise Tomography
    Derek Schutt, Colorado State University; Robert W. Porritt, Sandia National Laboratory; Clement Esteve, McGill University; Jeremy Gosselin, University of Calgary; Richard C. Aster, Colorado State University; Pascal Audet, University of Ottawa; Andrew Schaeffer, National Resources Canada; Jeffrey T. Freymueller, Michigan State University; Joel F. Cubley, Yukon University
  47. Variability in fractional changes in velocity structure (dv/v) using a repeating source and a small-aperture broadband posthole array
    Justin Wilgus, University of New Mexico; Adam Ringler, U.S. Geological Survey, Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory (ASL); Ryan Kirk Stairs, University of New Mexico; Robert Anthony, U.S. Geological Survey, ASL; Dave Wilson, U.S. Geological Survey, ASL; Brandon Schmandt, University of New Mexico
  48. Regional Tomography targeting mantle plumes by waveform inversion: the case of La Reunion Island
    Mathurin Wamba, Princeton University; Jean-Paul Montagner, Universite de Paris/Institut de physique du globe de Paris; Barbara Romanowicz, Berkeley Seismological Laboratory and College de France
  49. Subsurface Imaging of Kilauea using Nodal and Broadband Seismometers
    Jade Wight, University of Hawai'i, Manoa; Helen Janiszewski, University of Hawai'i, Manoa
  50. Seismic Velocity Changes below the Great Sitkin Volcano in Central Aleutian Volcanic Arc Associated with Recent Eruptive Activities
    Cody Kupres, Purdue University; Xiaotao Yang, Purdue University
  51. Relating Deformation and Gas Flux Using a Sealed System Model at Telica Volcano, Nicaragua
    Emilie Saucier, The Pennsylvania State University; Peter C. LaFemina, The Pennsylvania State University
  52. Magmatic Processes in the Naibor Soito distributed field area, Tanzania constrained from satellite geodesy and seismicity
    Cristy Ho, The Pennsylvania State University; Christelle Wauthier, The Pennsylvania State University
  53. Investigating Potential Melt Sources for the Magma-Poor Albertine-Rhino Graben of the East African Rift System Using 3D Geodynamic Modeling with ASPECT
    Asenath Kwagalakwe, Virginia Tech; D. Sarah Stamps, Virginia Tech; Emmanuel Njinju, Virginia Tech; Estella Atekwana, University of California, Davis; John Mary Kiberu, Makerere University (Uganda)
  54. Advances of the DRIAR Project: Dry-Rifting In the Albertine-Rhino Graben, Uganda
    D. Sarah Stamps, Virginia Tech; Estella Atekwana, University of California, Davis; Eliot Atekwana, University of California, Davis; Suzan van der Lee, Northwestern University; Michael Taylor, University of Kansas; Andrew Katumwehe, Midwestern State University; Rob Evans, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Fred Tugume, Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, Uganda; John Mary Kiberu, Makerere University, Uganda; Stewart Fishwick, Leicester University, U.K.; Peter H. Barry, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Saemundur Halldorsson, University of Iceland, Iceland; Folarin Kolawole, Columbia University; Georg Rumpker, Goethe Universitat, Germany; Asenath Kwagalakwe, Virginia Tech; Daniel Mongovin, University of Kansas; Hillary Mwongyera, University of Kansas; Joy Fuluso, University of California, Davis; Albert Kabanda, Northwestern University; Ben Alonzo, Northwestern University; Esha Islam, Virginia Tech; Crystal Lee, Virginia Tech; Damiloa Ola, Midwestern State University; Patrick Boston, Midwestern State University
  55. Surface deformation surrounding the 2021 M7.2 Haiti earthquake illuminated by InSAR observations
    Zoe Yin, Scripps Institution of Oceanography; Xioahua Xu, University of Texas at Austin; Jennifer S. Haase, Scripps Institution of Oceanography; David T. Sandwell, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
  56. Monitoring coastal subsidence in Miami Beach using Sentinel-1 InSAR time series observation
    Anurag Sharma, Florida International University; Shimon Wdowinski, Florida International University
Important Dates
  • Registration:
    Apr 11th – Jun 6th
  • Workshop dates:
    Jun 14th – 16th
  • Hotel RSVN Deadline:
    Wed, May 18th, 5pm
  • Scholarship Application:
    Mar 1st – 22nd
  • Abstract Submissions:
    Apr 11th – May 18th
  • Workshop Location