Peru-Chile Subduction Zone: Earthquakes & Tectonics


Keypoints:

 Western South America is a region of high earthquake hazard because of:

  • Tsunami-generating megathrust earthquakes on the Nazca –South America plate boundary
  • Major earthquakes within the subducting plate beneath populated coastal towns, and
  • Major earthquakes on faults within the continental crust.

Total Time: 10min 16s
Level: Novice

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