Distinguished Lectureship - Speakers

Dr. John Vidale

Professor and Director of the Southern California Earthquake Center
Department of Earth Sciences,
University of Southern California,
Los Angeles, California

A Tale of Three Pacific Northwest Temblors: One Big, One Deep and One Direct Hit

Curriculum Vitae

John Vidale is a Professor at the University of Southern California and Director of the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC). He completed his undergraduate studies at Yale University and earned his Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology. Before returning to southern California in summer 2017, Vidale spent more than a decade as a Professor at the University of Washington, Director of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, and the Washington State Seismologist. Prior to that, he worked at the University of California, Santa Cruz and the US Geological Survey, and taught for a decade at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). While at UCLA, Vidale was Director of the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics. His honors include the American Geophysical Union's Macelwane Medal (1994) and being named American Geophysical Union's Gutenberg lecturer in 2009. The College of the Environment at the University of Washington named Vidale the 2011 Researcher of the Year. Vidale’s research focuses on earthquakes, volcanoes, Earth structure, and the hazards of strong shaking. 

Sudden mayhem. Tremendous impact. Unpredictable disruption. Is it any wonder earthquakes reserve a dark corner in our nightmares?

The Pacific Northwest is vulnerable to several shades of shakes:

  • giant coastal quakes,
  • isolated, miles-deep pops, and
  • rips that could tear Seattle’s downtown apart.

The University of Washington’s M9 Project, led for several years by John Vidale, is making the repercussions of each type of quake clearer—and both less and more frightening. Vidale will share the latest research and prognoses, and offer insights on implementing early warning technologies in the Pacific Northwest, so we can gain a few seconds or even minutes before suffering the strongest shaking.

Date Venue
Nov 29, 2017 7:30 PM Town Hall Seattle, Phinney Neighborhood Association, Seattle, Washington
Nov 08, 2017 7:00 PM American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York
Jul 26, 2017 8:00 PM Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Empirical Theater, Portland, Oregon
Jan 27, 2017 7:00 PM Southwestern Oregon Community College, Coos Bay, Oregon


Dr. Stephen McNutt

Professor
School of Geosciences,
University of South Florida,
Tampa, Florida

Shaking and Baking: Using Seismology to Study Volcanoes

Curriculum Vitae

Stephen (Steve) R. McNutt is a volcano seismologist who worked half time for the Alaska Volcano Observatory from 1991-2012. He currently coordinates volcano seismology research for the School of Geosciences at the University of South Florida. His research interests include studies of source and propagation effects for volcanic tremor, low-frequency events, and explosion earthquakes; volcanic hazards assessments in Alaska, California, and Central America; the mechanical behavior of volcanoes including periodicity of eruptions; the effects of earth tides, sea level variations, and tectonic stresses on triggering eruptive activity; volcanic infrasound; and volcanic lightning. From July 1999 to July 2007 he served as Secretary General for the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior. He has served on several committees for the National Academy of Sciences, including the US National Committee for International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, the US National Committee for the Pacific Science Association, and the standing Committee on Seismology and Geodynamics. He received his B.A. from Wesleyan University in 1977, his M.A. from Columbia University in 1982, and his Ph.D. in volcanology from Columbia University in 1985.

Seismology is used to study volcanoes in several ways. Seismic tomography, similar to medical tomography, is used to probe beneath volcanoes for their velocity and attenuation structure. This reveals the size, shape and location of bodies of molten rock underground, such as magma chambers and conduits. Models have become more detailed over the years as techniques and data have improved.

One result of such studies is a model of the structure of the volcano.  The model then provides a conceptual pathway to interpret the seismic activity that occurs prior to eruptions. A common pattern is an increase first in volcano-tectonic earthquakes caused by increasing pressure in the magma chamber communicated to faults in the rocks nearby. This is followed by low-frequency earthquakes, which are likely related to fluid processes involving magma or water and gases. Third, a continuous signal known as volcanic tremor occurs when magma reaches shallow levels near the vent.  Explosions and strong eruption tremor are associated with the eruption. Deep earthquakes sometimes occur as stresses readjust after the removal of magma. Such patterns, together with understanding of physics, have enabled successful forecasts of eruptions over a range of sizes and types.

The strength and character of some eruption seismic signals also provides clues to make near-real time assessments of eruptions while they are in progress. For example, the strength of eruption tremor is proportional to the height of the ash column. Lava fountaining from fissures makes stronger tremor than fountaining of the same height from cylindrical conduits. Magma with more gases makes stronger seismic signals and more fine ash, which can influence the amount of volcanic lightning!

These are the types of questions that Professor McNutt will explore as he discusses how the movement of magma causes volcano shaking and baking.

Date Venue
Oct 21, 2017 7:00 PM Southwestern Oregon Community College, Coos Bay, Oregon
Jul 13, 2017 7:00 PM North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, Raleigh, North Carolina


Dr. Justin Rubinstein

Research Geophysicist
Induced Seismicity Project,
U.S. Geological Survey Menlo Park,
Menlo Park, California

Yes, Humans Really Are Causing Earthquakes

Curriculum Vitae

Dr. Justin Rubinstein is a seismologist and Deputy Chief of the Induced Seismicity Project at the United States Geological Survey (USGS) in Menlo Park, California. His research focuses on the ongoing surge of seismicity in the central United States and its relationship to oil and gas operations. This work includes developing methods to estimate the likelihood of earthquakes induced by oil and gas operations and field studies of seismicity in the Raton Basin (southern Colorado and northern New Mexico) and the Mississippi Lime Play (southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma). Dr. Rubinstein has worked on many topics related to earthquakes including: earthquake forecasting, controls on earthquake ground shaking, and causes of damage in the 1994 Northridge earthquake near Los Angeles. Rubinstein received his Bachelor’s Degree from University of California, Los Angeles and his Master’s and Doctorate from Stanford University.

View Video

The central United States is experiencing an unprecedented surge in earthquakes that began in 2009, rising from an average of 21 magnitude 3 and larger quakes to over 650 in 2014 alone. This increased earthquake activity is found in just a few concentrated regions around the country, with the lion’s share in Oklahoma. In 2014 there were more magnitude 3 and larger earthquakes in Oklahoma than there were in California. The increased earthquake activity is limited to areas of new and emerging oil and gas production and is undoubtedly caused by some of the techniques they use.

With a focus on oil and gas production and related techniques, I will discuss the many ways that humans can cause earthquakes. In the case of fluid injection, the primary source of the recent increase in earthquake rate, the fluid pressure increase from injection can be transferred many miles from the injection point. This fluid-pressure increase, in effect, lubricates the faults, making them more prone to slipping in earthquakes.

Recent research shows that the rate at which injection occurs strongly influences whether earthquakes will be induced. Areas with higher injection rates are more likely to have induced earthquakes. Other parameters, like the total volume injected and the depth of injection, are also believed to affect the likelihood of induced earthquakes. Additionally, local geological conditions are important. Despite similar injection practices, there is very little injection-induced seismicity in North Dakota in stark contrast to Oklahoma.

Given that these earthquakes are human-caused, there is hope that they can be minimized or even stopped. Slowing or stopping injection, changing injection depths, or trucking fluids to other locations have all been suggested as ways to curb induced seismicity. Regulators in a number of states have taken notice of the increased seismicity and are taking action to reduce the likelihood of damaging temblors. With future research to improve our understanding of fluid-injection induced earthquakes, we may be able to reduce their likelihood, something that is not possible for natural earthquakes. To accomplish this, though, it will require cooperation between all the stakeholders, including academic scientists, regulators, and the oil and gas industry.

Date Venue
Nov 15, 2016 6:00 PM Harvard Museums of Science & Culture, Geological Lecture Hall, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Nov 10, 2016 7:00 PM American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York
Oct 14, 2016 7:00 PM Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland, Ohio
Jun 02, 2016 7:00 PM OMSI Science Pub, McMenamins Mission Theater, Portland, Oregon
Apr 30, 2016 10:00 AM Cosmosphere, Hutchinson, Kansas


Dr. Caroline Beghein

Associate Professor
Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences,
University of California, Los Angeles,
Los Angeles, California

From Plate Tectonics to Deep Earth Dynamics: A Seismological Journey Inside the Earth

Curriculum Vitae

Dr. Caroline Beghein is an associate professor in seismology at the University of California, Los Angeles, where she has been working since 2008. Her research involves studying the Earth’s deep interior and how it relates to surface plate tectonics using recordings of earthquakes all over the globe. Caroline Beghein received her BSc degree in physics in 1997 from the Université de Liège, Belgium, from which she graduated with high honors, and a MSc degree in solid Earth geophysics from the Institut de Physique du Globe in Paris, France, in 1998. She graduated cum laude from Utrecht University, The Netherlands, in 2003 with a PhD in seismology. Before joining the faculty at UCLA, she spent two years, from 2004 to 2005, as a postdoctoral scholar at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and she was a postdoctoral research associate in the School of Earth & Space Exploration at Arizona State University in 2006 and 2007. She was awarded the 2005 Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Young Scientists by the European Geophysical Union and the UCLA Assistant Professor Career Development Award in 2009.

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The motion of the tectonic plates that divide the Earth's surface explains many geological features and events - from mountain building, to deep oceanic trenches, to earthquakes, tsunami generation, and the presence of volcanoes. These motions at the surface are driven by processes deeper inside the Earth, in particular by the overturn of the mantle through convection: hot, lighter rocks rise to the surface and cold, denser material sinks. This process causes solid rocks in the mantle to flow and deform over geological time scales. To understand what happens at the surface, we need to study the deep Earth interior. We cannot, however, directly sample rocks from the mantle. Instead, scientists use recordings of the waves generated by earthquakes to map the physical properties of mantle rocks.

In this presentation, I will explain how seismologists are able to take the temperature of the Earth’s interior using these seismic recordings and how we can detect the direction of mantle flow with seismic waves. I will also talk about recent advances that help us better understand the relation between the motions of the rigid plates at the surface and the deformation of the underlying convecting mantle.

Date Venue
Oct 07, 2016 7:00 PM Southwestern Oregon Community College, Coos Bay, Oregon
Aug 29, 2016 7:00 PM OMSI Science Pub, The Venetian Theatre, Hillsboro, Oregon
Jan 30, 2016 11:30 AM Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Rutgers, New Jersey


Dr. Thorne Lay

Professor
Department of Earth and Marine Sciences,
University of California, Santa Cruz,
Santa Cruz, California

A Global Surge of Great Earthquakes and What We are Learning From Them

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During the decade 2004-2014, 18 huge earthquakes with seismic magnitudes larger than 8.0 struck around the world, sometimes causing horrendous destruction and loss of life. The annual rate of such events was 2.5 times greater than had been experienced over the previous century of seismological observations.  Deployment of global networks of very high-quality seismic, geodetic, and tsunami recording systems had preceded most of these events, allowing unprecedented signals to be recorded for these great earthquakes.

Geophysicists have analyzed the recorded waves and ground motions to determine details of each earthquake, advancing our understanding of these dangerous events.  Most of the earthquakes have involved surprises, rapidly revising scientific ideas about the behavior of huge fault ruptures and indicating the need for improved mitigation efforts.

Date Venue
Nov 12, 2015 6:30 PM American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York
Oct 23, 2015 7:00 PM Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland, Ohio
Oct 08, 2015 12:00 PM University of California Center Sacramento, Sacramento, California
Sep 10, 2015 7:30 PM Seattle Town Hall, Seattle, Washington
Jul 13, 2015 7:00 PM OMSI Science Pub, The Hollywood Theatre, Portland, Oregon
Jun 22, 2015 2:00 PM IRIS Webinar, Internet, Internet
Mar 04, 2015 11:00 AM University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas


Dr. Doug Wiens

Professor
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences,
Washington University,
Saint Louis, Missouri

Fire and Ice: Volcanoes, Earth Structure, and the Evolution of the Antarctic Ice Sheet

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The continent of Antarctica supports the largest ice sheets in the world. The history of the ice sheets is intertwined with the geological history of continent, involving processes such as mountain building, the response of the land to the weight of glaciers, and heat flow melting and lubricating the bottom of the ice sheet. Very little is known about the history of Antarctica because the ice sheets preclude the usual geological sampling and mapping, so seismology offers a method to “see through the ice” and understand the continent beneath. Recent advances in technology now allow autonomous seismographs to be deployed across the continent for the first time.

In this presentation I will discuss projects that are installing seismographs across Antarctica and summarize recent discoveries. New results reveal that East Antarctica represents an ancient continent, with an average geological age of greater than one billion years and with highlands supported by thick continental crust.  In contrast, West Antarctica shows evidence of recent tectonic activity, and high heat flow that may lubricate the base of the ice sheet. The seismographs record earthquakes from magma movement associated with volcanoes beneath the ice. The high mantle temperatures suggest low mantle viscosity, such that the response of the land to ice mass changes will occur within a few hundred years. These insights are changing the way we model the recent history of the ice sheet.

Seismograms also provide important constraints on the movement and forces acting on the ice sheets. “Icequakes” ranging from very small cracking events near the surface of the ice sheet to massive crevassing and calving episodes produce unique seismic signals that help reveal the physics of ice movement. The largest signals come from a unique region on the Whillans Ice Stream, where a 100 mile-long section of the ice stream lurches forward twice a day, triggered by ocean tides, and sending seismic waves traveling across the entire continent. This unusual behavior may signal the slowing down of this ice stream in response to changes in the amount of water along the ice stream bed.

Date Venue
Oct 27, 2015 7:30 PM Seattle Town Hall, Seattle, Washington
Oct 26, 2015 7:00 PM OMSI Science Pub, The Venetian Theatre, Hillsboro, Oregon
Oct 25, 2015 3:00 PM Southwestern Oregon Community College, Coos Bay, Oregon
May 13, 2015 2:00 PM IRIS Webinar, Internet, Internet
May 09, 2015 1:00 PM Fernbank Science Center, Atlanta, Georgia


Dr. Meredith Nettles

Associate Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory,
Columbia University,
Palisades, New York

Glacial Earthquakes: Using Seismic and GPS Observations to Map Changes in Glaciers and Ice Sheets Worldwide

The great ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica are losing mass, transferring more than 500 billion tons of water to the ocean each year. Most of this ice enters the ocean from large outlet glaciers: rivers of ice draining giant ice reservoirs. Understanding the behavior of the outlet glaciers is critical for accurate prediction of sea-level rise. The outlet glaciers are changing rapidly, with large variations in flow speed, thickness, and extent. In Greenland, many of the largest glaciers also produce seismic signals the size of those from magnitude 5 earthquakes, strong enough to be recorded around the globe.

The number of glacial earthquakes is increasing, with six times as many earthquakes occurring in recent years as in the early 1990s. I'll discuss the discovery of these peculiar earthquakes, and show how combining earthquake data with GPS measurements from glaciers allows us to learn how the glaciers and ice sheets may be affected by changing environmental conditions. Ice, the tides, earthquakes, and meltwater combine in a fascinating and complex system with real implications for our lives, whether on the coast or in the middle of the continent.

Date Venue
Nov 12, 2014 2:00 PM American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York
Sep 23, 2014 6:00 PM New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque, New Mexico
Apr 07, 2014 7:00 PM OMSI Science Pub, The Hollywood Theatre, Portland, Oregon


Dr. Jean-Paul Ampuero

Assistant Professor of Seismology
California Institute of Technology,
Pasadena, California

Earth's Cocktail Party: Deciphering the Physics of Earthquakes With Networks of Seismic Arrays

Date Venue
Jan 31, 2015 9:00 AM Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Rutgers, New Jersey
Oct 14, 2014 2:30 PM Noel Wein Public Library, Fairbanks, Alaska
May 10, 2014 2:00 PM Fernbank Science Center, Atlanta, Georgia


Dr. Lara Wagner

Associate Professor, Seismology and Tectonics
Department of Geological Sciences,
University of North Carolina,
Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Imaging the Ancient Margin: How the Southeastern United States Was Built (And Why You Should Care)

Date Venue
Jan 24, 2014 7:00 PM Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Rutgers, New Jersey
Sep 12, 2013 8:00 PM Carnegie Institution for Science, Washington, DC
Apr 19, 2013 8:00 PM Fernbank Science Center, Atlanta, Georgia


Dr. Gavin Hayes

Research Geophysicist
USGA National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC),
Golden, Colorado

Mitigating Disasters: Earthquake Response in the 21st Century

Date Venue
Apr 24, 2014 10:00 AM Seattle Town Hall, Seattle, Washington
Jan 18, 2014 9:00 AM Southwestern Oregon Community College, Coos Bay, Oregon
Sep 25, 2013 8:00 PM American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York


Dr. Miaki Ishii

Associate Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences
Harvard Seismology Group,
Harvard University,
Cambridge, Massachusetts

Dissecting Giant Earthquakes: Things We Didn't Know

Date Venue
Jan 25, 2013 7:00 PM Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Rutgers, New Jersey
Nov 12, 2012 11:00 AM University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario
Oct 12, 2012 10:00 AM Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland, Ohio
Apr 28, 2012 10:00 AM Fernbank Science Center, Atlanta, Georgia
Apr 24, 2012 10:00 AM American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York


Dr. Gregory Beroza

Wayne Loel Professor; Department Chair
Department of Geophysics,
Stanford University,
Stanford, California

The Tortoise and the Hare: Slow vs Fast Earthquakes

Date Venue
Sep 16, 2013 8:00 PM University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska
Feb 17, 2013 7:00 PM New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque, New Mexico
Jan 19, 2013 7:00 PM Southwestern Oregon Community College, Coos Bay, Oregon
Nov 12, 2012 7:00 PM OMSI Science Pub, The Hollywood Theatre, Portland, Oregon
Oct 24, 2012 10:00 AM IRIS Headquarters, AAAS Building, Washington, DC


Dr. Wayne D. Pennington

Michigan Technological University,
Houghton, Michigan

Preparing for the Future: Scientific and Humanitarian Lessons from the Haiti and Japan earthquakes

Date Venue
Feb 22, 2012 10:00 AM OMSI Science Pub, The Hollywood Theatre, Portland, Oregon
Sep 12, 2011 10:00 AM Special Events Center, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho
Apr 25, 2011 11:00 AM American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York
Apr 21, 2011 11:00 AM Fernbank Science Center, Atlanta, Georgia
Mar 15, 2011 10:00 AM University of Connecticut, Storrs Campus, Storrs, Connecticut
Mar 07, 2011 10:00 AM Allendale Columbia School, Rochester, New York


Dr. Beatrice Magnani

Associate Professor
Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences,
Southern Methodist University,
Dallas, Texas

The New Madrid Earthquakes Two Hundred Years Later: What Have We Learned About Earthquakes at the Center of Tectonic Plates?

Date Venue
Jan 19, 2012 11:00 AM Adventure Science Center, Nashville, Tennessee
Oct 27, 2011 11:00 AM New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque, New Mexico
Oct 21, 2011 11:00 AM Southwestern Oregon Community College, Coos Bay, Oregon
Oct 14, 2011 11:00 AM Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland, Ohio
Apr 28, 2011 10:00 AM Pink Palace Family of Museums, Sharpe Planetarium, Memphis, Tennessee


Dr. Brian Stump

Southern Methodist University,
Dallas, Texas

Forensic Seismology and Nucler Testing: The Detective Work of Seismologists

Date Venue
Jan 29, 2011 11:00 AM Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Rutgers, New Jersey
Nov 30, 2010 10:00 AM New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque, New Mexico
Nov 08, 2010 10:00 AM Utah State University, Logan, Utah
Oct 15, 2010 11:00 AM Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland, Ohio


Dr. Stephen Malone

University of Washington,
Seattle, Washington

Predicting Earthquakes and Volcanic Eruptions: What Can and Can't Now Be Done

Date Venue
Nov 18, 2010 11:00 AM University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada
Nov 16, 2010 10:00 AM Rice University, Houston, Texas
Sep 30, 2010 11:00 AM Waubonsee Community College, Sugar Grove, Illinois
Sep 07, 2010 10:00 AM The Merc Playhouse, Twisp, Washington
May 06, 2010 11:00 AM American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York
Apr 20, 2010 10:00 AM OMSI Science Pub, The Hollywood Theatre, Portland, Oregon
Mar 19, 2010 10:00 AM National Science Teacher’s Association (NSTA), Philadelphia, Pennslyvania


Dr. Aaron A. Velasco

University of Texas at El Paso,
El Paso, Texas

Can a Large Earthquake in Another Country Cause One in Your Backyard?

Date Venue
Sep 22, 2009 11:00 AM Humboldt State University, Arcata, California
Sep 02, 2009 11:00 AM School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State Unviversity, Tempe, Arizona
Apr 15, 2009 10:00 AM Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Denver, Colorado
Feb 21, 2009 10:00 AM Southwestern Oregon Community College, Coos Bay, Oregon


Dr. Richard C. Aster

New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technolgy,
Socorro, New Mexico

Taking Earth's Pulse and Temperature Using Seismology: Roaring Oceans and Singing Icebergs

Date Venue
Apr 29, 2010 10:00 AM Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado
Nov 05, 2009 11:00 AM University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas
Oct 26, 2009 10:00 AM New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque, New Mexico
Jun 24, 2009 11:00 AM American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York
May 20, 2009 11:00 AM Stanford University, Stanford, California
Apr 22, 2009 10:00 AM New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque, New Mexico
Mar 24, 2009 11:00 AM Aquarium of the Pacific, Longbeach, California
Mar 12, 2009 10:00 AM Fernbank Science Center, Atlanta, Georgia


Dr. Cliff Frohlich

,
,

Deep Earthquakes and the Secret of Seismology

Date Venue
Oct 09, 2008 8:00 PM Rio Grande Valley Science Association Conference, Mercedes, Texas
Sep 22, 2008 3:00 PM Hanover College, Madison, Indiana
Sep 16, 2008 3:00 PM Eckerd College, St. Petersburg, Florida
Sep 04, 2008 3:00 PM University of Hawaii, Hawaii, Hawaii
Apr 15, 2008 3:00 PM Grinnel College, Grinnell, Iowa
Apr 11, 2008 3:00 PM Carleton College, Northfield, Minnesota
Mar 03, 2008 2:00 PM Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan
Feb 19, 2008 2:00 PM New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque, New Mexico


Dr. Uri ten Brink

U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole Science Center,
Woods Hole, Massachusetts

Peace and Science in the Middle East

Date Venue
Oct 17, 2008 3:00 PM Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland, Ohio
Jun 12, 2008 3:00 PM American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York
May 29, 2008 6:00 PM Oregon State University, Eugene, Oregon
Apr 29, 2008 10:00 AM Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois
Feb 19, 2008 10:00 AM Penn State, University Park, Pennslyvania


Dr. Anne Sheehan

,
,

Seeing Beneath Mt. Everest: Probing a Breeding Ground of Destructive Earthquakes

Date Venue
Nov 28, 2007 3:00 PM San Diego State University, San Diego, California
Oct 23, 2007 4:00 PM Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts
Oct 23, 2007 4:00 PM Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts
Oct 19, 2007 4:00 PM Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland, Ohio
Oct 12, 2007 4:00 PM California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California
Oct 01, 2007 4:00 PM Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, California
Aug 14, 2007 4:00 PM Houston Museum of Science, Houston, Texas
Jun 26, 2007 4:00 PM Arvada North Middle School, Arvada, Colorado
Jun 14, 2007 4:00 PM American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York
May 03, 2007 4:00 PM University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska
Mar 20, 2007 4:00 PM New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque, New Mexico
Mar 06, 2007 3:00 PM Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan
Feb 23, 2007 3:00 PM Golden West Senior center, Boulder, Colorado


Dr. Brian Atwater

U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole Science Center,
Woods Hole, Massachusetts

The Orphan Tsunami of 1700 - A Trans-Pacific Detective Story

Date Venue
Nov 14, 2007 2:00 PM Earlham College, Richmond, Indiana
Nov 06, 2007 7:00 PM Portland State University, Portland, Oregon
Oct 23, 2007 8:00 PM Waubonsee Community College, Sugar Grove, Illinois
Oct 22, 2007 8:00 PM University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama
Oct 18, 2007 8:00 PM Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois
Oct 16, 2007 8:00 PM Grand Valley State University, Allendale, Michigan
Oct 03, 2007 3:00 PM Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, Karnataka
Sep 04, 2007 3:00 PM Aquarium of the Pacific, Longbeach, California
Mar 15, 2007 3:00 PM Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia
Jan 27, 2007 2:00 PM Southwestern Oregon Community College, Coos Bay, Oregon


Dr. Mary Lou Zoback

U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole Science Center,
Woods Hole, Massachusetts

The 1906 Earthquake - Lessons Learned, Lessons Forgotten, and Future Directions

Date Venue
Jun 13, 2006 4:00 PM American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York
Apr 26, 2006 4:00 PM San Diego Natural History Museum, San Diego, California
Apr 08, 2006 4:00 PM National Science Teachers Association, Anaheim, California
Mar 22, 2006 3:00 PM University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
Mar 15, 2006 3:00 PM University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California


Dr. Ed Garnero

Arizona State University,
Phoenix, Arizona

Vibrations From the Deep: Deciphering the Birth and Death of the Earth's Surface

Date Venue
Nov 14, 2006 3:00 PM Palms Springs Public Library, Palm Springs, California
Oct 05, 2006 8:00 PM Arizona Science Center, Phoenix, Arizona
Sep 19, 2006 4:00 PM Houston Museum of Science, Houston, Texas
May 17, 2006 4:00 PM San Diego Natural History Museum, San Diego, California


Dr. Seth Stein

Northwestern University,
Evanston, Illinois

Giant Earthquakes: Why, Where, When, and What We Can Do

Date Venue
Nov 15, 2006 3:00 PM University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma
Oct 28, 2006 4:00 PM Evanston Township High School, Evanston, Illinois
Oct 18, 2006 4:00 PM University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
Oct 13, 2006 4:00 PM Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland, Ohio
Sep 13, 2006 4:00 PM Waubonsee Community College, Sugar Grove, Illinois
May 08, 2006 4:00 PM San Diego Natural History Museum, San Diego, California
Apr 27, 2006 4:00 PM University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama
Mar 07, 2006 3:00 PM New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque, New Mexico
Feb 17, 2006 3:00 PM Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, Washington, District of Columbia


Dr. Michael Wysession

Washington University,
Saint Louis, Missouri

Earthquakes, Tsunamis, and a Modern Journey to the Center of the Earth

Date Venue
Nov 15, 2005 3:00 PM Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Denver, Colorado
Oct 23, 2005 4:00 PM St. Louis Science Center, St. Louis, Missouri
Sep 23, 2005 4:00 PM Arizona Science Center, Phoenix, Arizona
Jul 23, 2005 4:00 PM Field Museum, Chicago, Illinois
Jun 30, 2005 4:00 PM American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York
Jun 21, 2005 4:00 PM Houston Museum of Science, Houston, Texas
May 13, 2005 4:00 PM Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, Washington, District of Columbia
May 12, 2005 4:00 PM Maryland Science Center, Baltimore, Maryland
Apr 02, 2005 3:00 PM National Science Teachers Association (NSTA), Dallas, Texas
Jan 01, 2005 3:00 PM New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque, New Mexico


Dr. Susan Hough

U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole Science Center,
Woods Hole, Massachusetts

The Very Long Reach of Very Large Earthquakes

Date Venue
Nov 18, 2005 3:00 PM Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, Washington, District of Columbia
Nov 05, 2005 3:00 PM Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland, Ohio
May 17, 2005 4:00 PM Houston Museum of Science, Houston, Texas
Apr 28, 2005 4:00 PM SSA Annual Meeting, Memphis, Tennessee
Feb 04, 2005 3:00 PM Museum of Science, Boston, Massachusetts
Jan 26, 2005 3:00 PM University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California


Dr. David E. James

Research Geophysicist
Carnegie Institution for Science,
Washington, DC

Revealing the Mysteries of the Earth's Deep Interior: Plates, Plumes, and the Birth of Modern Seismology

Date Venue
Sep 30, 2004 4:00 PM Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Denver, Colorado
Jul 29, 2004 4:00 PM University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, Gauteng
Jun 10, 2004 4:00 PM IRIS Annual Meeting ‘04, Tucson, Arizona
Apr 30, 2004 4:00 PM Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, Washington, District of Columbia


 David Wald

U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole Science Center,
Woods Hole, Massachusetts

Rapid Earthquake Information: Citizen Science and New Tools for Emergency Response

Date Venue
Sep 08, 2004 4:00 PM University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado
May 12, 2004 4:00 PM New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque, New Mexico
Apr 16, 2004 4:00 PM SSA Annual Meeting ‘04, Palm Springs, California
Mar 26, 2004 3:00 PM University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas


Dr. Roger Bilham

University of Colorado,
Boulder, Colorado

Death and Construction: Earthquakes on an Urban Planet

Date Venue
Oct 16, 2003 4:00 PM St. Louis Science Center, St. Louis, Missouri
Sep 12, 2003 4:00 PM Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland, Ohio
May 02, 2003 4:00 PM SSA Annual Meeting ‘03, San Juan, Puerto Rico
Mar 21, 2003 3:00 PM University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
Mar 03, 2003 3:00 PM Museum of Science, Boston, Massachusetts


Dr. Walter Mooney

U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole Science Center,
Woods Hole, Massachusetts

The Discovery of the Earth: The Quest to Understand the Interior of our Planet

Date Venue
Nov 14, 2003 3:00 PM Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, Washington, District of Columbia
Nov 12, 2003 3:00 PM Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Denver, Colorado
Jun 06, 2003 4:00 PM IRIS Annual Meeting ‘03, Yosemite, California
Feb 03, 2003 3:00 PM New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque, New Mexico