This group of videos is selected from the videos below and placed in order from Earth structure to seismic waves to help guide a novice through the topics.  There are no tabbed links to related resources for the individual videos, but you can find them on the stand-alone links below if you would like to find related lessons, animations, etc.

Earthquake science can be daunting to teach, and how it is presented affects understanding. In this series of videos analogies are used to clarify complex topics. 

Video Novice

This group of short animations walk you through the steps to properly set up an AS-1 seismometer. The AmaSeis Manual is also an optional resource.

Video Novice

How can I demonstrate plate tectonic principles in the classroom?

Video lecture demonstrates the use of foam faults to demonstrate faults, and a deck of cards to demonstrate folds and fabrics in rock layers. Different types of faults include: normal (extensional) faults; reverse or thrust (compressional) faults; and strike-slip (shearing) faults.

Video Novice

This demonstration, squeezing uncooked spaghetti noodles in a wood template set in a vise, effectively shows how asperities (stuck patches) on a fault rupture at different times.

Video Novice

Video lecture about elastic rebound and brittle material in the crust using a yardstick as a mechanical analog. This demonstrates elasticity, brittle fracture, and why it is difficult to predict earthquakes.

Video Novice

Video lecture on how temperature controls mechanical behavior of materials, including rocks. A Big Hunk candy bar is used as a model. The cold candy bar is brittle whereas the warm candy bar is ductile or "plastic".

Video Novice

The Earthquake Machine is a model of the earthquake process using a wood block, sandpaper, and rubber bands. This model shows how elastic energy is slowly stored as the rubber back stretches, and then rapidly releases the energy as the block jerks in an "earthquake".

Video Novice

Demonstration shows that rocks are elastic by squeezing a slit core of rock.

Video Novice

THE two-block "Earthquake Machine" uses two blocks with different grit sandpaper to model interactions between adjacent patches along a fault.

Video Intermediate

Conceptual model of the relative thicknesses of the Lithosphere relative to the diameter of the Earth uses a hard-boiled egg to gain understanding about the scale of the lithospheric plates.

Video Novice

Silly Putty is used as a model to show how the asthenosphere is elastic when exposed to short-duration forces (like seismic waves) but plastic when exposed to long-duration forces (like the load of the Hawaiian Islands on the Pacific Plate).

Video Novice

Video lecture covers three basic types of tectonic plate boundaries.

Video Novice

The arrival times of P and S waves are used to determine the distance to an earthquake using standard travel-time curves. 

Video Novice

This video shows how to build the "Earthquake Machine", a physical model that represents the “earthquake cycle”, the slow accumulation of elastic energy in rocks adjacent to a fault followed by rapid release of elastic energy during an earthquake.

Video Novice

Video lecture shows parts and tools needed to build an effective foam fault model. 

Video Novice

The BOSS model is an effective way to show how buildings of different heights respond to seismic waves. All buildings have a natural frequency.

Video Novice

This video lecture shows John Lahr (USGS Seismologist Emeritus) describing the BOSS experiment that models oscillations of different height buildings.

Video Novice

John Lahr, US Geological Survey Seismologist, demonstrating a cheap and kid-friendly version of the BOSS model that shows how buildings of different height oscillate during earthquake shaking.

Video Novice

Understanding the magnitude change, thus the relative energy released from say, magnitude 7 to magnitude 8 can be challenging. Dr. Robert Butler (Univ. Portland) uses spaghetti to illustrate the concept by breaking pasta to show how each step up in magnitude represents a huge jump in the size of the pasta bundles. Each step in magnitude is represented by 32 times more spaghetti noodles.

 

 

Video Novice

Demonstration by Dr. Robert Butler on how to design a structure to withstand shaking during an earthquake. This video walks you through the parts needed to construct the model, and shows you how to build it. 

Video Novice

How can I get across the idea in a classroom activity using no props?

The human wave is used as an analogy for travel times of P and S seismic waves.
This draft video uses arms over shoulders as well as hand holding methods, so read the caveats about the best method (arms over shoulders). 

Video Novice

What can you do to protect a building from earthquake shaking?  This “Build a Better Wall” classroom activity is designed to allow students to experiment with methods to build shear strength into buildings to withstand an earthquake. Uses simple materials to engineer shear walls.

 

 

Video Novice

Instructional video shows how to conduct 5-step student activity to build gum-drop GPS station, learn how GPS works, then model and graph the GPS movement.

This video, Part A, covers Steps 1 and 2: building and using a gumdrop GPS station.

In Part B (steps 3-5), students learn how to read time-series plots and understand how we know the ground is moving. 

Video Novice

Instructional video shows how to conduct 5-step student activity to build gum-drop GPS station, learn how GPS works, then model and graph the GPS movement.

Part A, covered the steps to build and use a gumdrop GPS station.

In this video, Part B, students learn how to read time-series plots and understand how we know the ground is moving.

Video Novice

Classroom demonstration using gelatin as a model for teaching magma injection into Earth's crust. The gelatin provides a see-through medium as an analogy for the crust.

Video Novice

jAmaSeis is a free, java-based program that allows users to obtain and display seismic data in real-time from either a local instrument or from remote stations. This video walks you through the steps to set it up on your computer.

Video Novice