Seismic/Eruption

This program plots earthquake locations through time on a map of the world or on maps of various geographical areas. Students see for themselves which areas of the Earth are more or less seismically active, where plate boundaries occur, typical depths of earthquakes, and sense that large earthquakes do not occur as often as smaller earthquakes. Student can also interrogate the earthquake catalog to obtain quantitative data on the rate of occurrence of earthquakes of various magnitudes within their chosen region.


Level: Novice

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