Global Seismographic Network

THIS POSTER IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT - The Global Seismographic Network (GSN) consists of more than 125 GSN stations located around the world with near-uniform spacing - from the South Pole to Siberia, and from the Amazon Basin to the seafloor of the Northeast Pacific Ocean. This multi-use facility provides data for scientific research, education, earthquake hazard mitigation, tsunami warning, and the international monitoring system for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. In addition, real-time GSN data are broadcast to museum displays that are seen by over 10 million visitors each year.


Keypoints:

  • The Global Seismographic Network (GSN) consisting of more than 125 seismic stations.
  • GSN stations provide data for scientific research, education, earthquake hazard mitigation, tsunami warning, and the international monitoring system for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty.

 

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