Earthquake Machine 2—Developing Arguments About Earthquake Occurrence

This activity uses the Earthquake Machine, a mechanical model that illustrates the earthquake cycle, as a tool to investigate the behavior of fault systems. In the activity groups of students are presented with a claim about earthquakes. Using the Earthquake Machine, students design an investigation to collect data to either refute or support the claim they were presented with. After students have collected evidence they use this information to construct an argument regarding the claim. Next, students present their work to their knowledgeable peers for a skeptical review.

 

 

Objectives:

  • Explain earthquakes as a part of the natural Earth System
  • Describe the global trends for earthquake occurrence and size
  • Critically analyze data generated by the Earthquake Machine and use the data to develop an argument about earthquake occurance
  • Describe the role sharing of science results with peers plays an important part of the science process.

Total Time: 1h 30min
Level: Novice

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