Pacific Northwest Earthquake Locations: Flash

The Pacific Northwest is host to three kinds of earthquakes revealed in this Flash rollover. Subduction zone great earthquakes, shallow crustal quakes, and earthquakes within the subducting plate. Scroll over the colored spots for date, magnitude, and location for the smaller earthquakes and additional details for the larger. 

 

 

VIEW the interactive in a separate tab, by clicking on "Open Resource". (Note some browsers lack the plugins for rollovers.)

OR click Download All.  AFTER downloading, you can Open either:

  •  by using Flash player, or
  •  by clicking File > Open from within your browser, find the file on your computer, and it should open as an interactive file. 

 


Level: Novice

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