Long Valley Caldera

Long Valley Caldera area has had a history of eruptions and earthquake swarms.  Learn more with this interactive map that reveals geology, eruptions, earthquakes, and more.

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Keypoints:

  • Eruptive products of the region are younger than 1 million years.
  • The youngest eruptions occurred in the past 4,000 years
  • A 1980 earthquake swarm was accompanied by ground deformation and uplift
  • Ash from the eruption of the Bishop Tuff covered much of the Western U.S.

 


Level: Novice

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